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Full text of "Annual Catalogue"

H 3.1 K 







Hastings College 



1 90r-8 



CATALOGUE OF 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 



HASTINGS, NEBRASKA 



TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR 



1907-8 



PRINTED FOR THE COLLEGE. 
1906. 



Hastings College Outlook 



VI IX 



Hastingrs, Neb , June 1908. 



No. 1 



Entered at the postoffice at Hastings, Nebraska, as second- 
class matter. 



S M 

5 6 
12 13 
19 20 

26 27 

S M 



10 11 
17 18 
24 25 
31 



APRIL 

T W T 

1 2 

7 8 9 

14 15 IG 

21 22 23 

28 29 30 

T W T 

5 6 7 
12 13 14 
19 20 21 

26 27 28 



F 



o 
o 



S 
4 

10 11 
17 18 
24 25 



F S 

1 2 

8 9 

15 16 

22 23 

29 30 



S M 
1 
7 8 
14 15 
21 22 
28 29 



JUNE 

T V/ T F S 

2 3 4 5 6 

9 10 11 12 13 

16 17 18 19 20 

23 24 25 26 27 



30 



JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

5 6 7 8 9 

12 13 14 15 16 

19 20 21 22 23 

26 27 2S 29 30 



3 4 
10 11 
17 18 
24 25 



31 

APRIL 
S M T W T F S 
1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 S 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 



1908 

JULY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 

AUGUST 
S M T W T F S 

1 



2 



4 5 6 7 8 



9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 

SEPTEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 34 25 2G 
•27 28 29 30 

1909 

FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 

MAY 
S M T W T F S 

1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 



OCTOBER 

S M T W T F S 
12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 

NOVEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 

DECEMBER 
S M T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 

MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



JUNE 

S T^I T W T F S 
12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



#>1 



\-^ 



Calendar 1908-09 



1908. 

September 8 Registration and Examinations, 9:00 

a. m. to 4:00 p. m. 

September 9 First Semester begins 10:00 a. m. 

October 21 Examination for removal of condi- 
tions of Second Semester. 

November 2G Thanksgiving Holiday. 

Dccemb.er 19 Christmas Recess begins. 

1909. 

•January 5 Christmas Recess ends. 

January 21 Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

January 27 Examinations for First Semester 

end. 

February 22 Washington's Birthday. 

March 10 Examination for removal of condi- 
tions of First Semester ends. 

March 30 Senior Recognition Day. 

May 8 Presentation of Senior Theses. 

June 5 Senior Academy Class Play. 

June 6 10:30 a. m., Baccalaureate Sermon. 

8:00 p. m., Address to the Christian 
Associations. 

June 7 Morning — Recital in Oratory. 

Afternoon — Athletic Events. 
Evening — Annual Concert. 

June 8 Morning — Currens Biblical Oratori- 
cal Contest. 

Afternoon — Annual Meeting of Board 
of Trustees. 

Class Day Exercises. 

Evening — Dinner of Hastings College 
Society, and Junior Lawn Fete. 

June 9 10:00 a. m.. Commencement Day. 

12:00 m.. Alumni Banquet. 



Board of Trustees 



EXECUTIVE COTvlMITTEE. 
A. L. CLARKE, President. 

S. ALEXANDER, Vice Pre«ident.* 
W. N. FILSON, Secretary. 

P. L. JOHNSON, Treasurer. 
J. N. Clarke Oswald Oliver 

Fred L. Pease A. E. Turner V/. F. Buchanan 



TRUSTEES. 

TERM EXPIRING 1908. 

W. A. Voigt Nelson 

M, V/. Folsom Lincoln 

C. W. McConaughy Hcldrege 

Qalem G. Pattison Brownsburg, Incl. 

W. H. Ferguson Lincoln 

Osv/ald Oliver Kafitings 

J. N. Clarke Hastingn 

W. F. Buchanan Hastings 

C. E. Higinbotham Hastings 

TERM EXPIRING 1909. 

Hon. A. L. Clarke Hastings 

George H. Pratt Hastings 

P. L. Johnson' Hastings 

Fred L. Pease Hastings 

Samuel Alexander^i^ Hastings 

Dean H. B. V/ard Lincoln 

Rev. A. R. DesJardien Lincoln 

Rev. C. W. Weyer Hasting 3 

Pros. A. E. Turner Hastings 

TERM EXPIRING 1910. 

Supt . R. D. Moritz Red Cloud 

Henry Fox, Jr Nelson 

A. L. Wigton Omaha 

Rev. James L. Leeper, D. D New York 

Rev. B. M. Long, D. D Lincoln 

Dean \V. N. Filson Hastings 

Tiev. Silas Cooke, D. D Red Oak, Iowa 

Rev. VV. F. Ringland, I). D Wooster, Ohio 

George T. Bissell Central City 

=; Deceased. 



Committees of the Board 



ENDOWIV^ENT COMMITTEE. 

J. N. CLARKE, Chairman. 

FRED PEASE, Secretary and Treasurer. 
S. G. Pattison M. W. Polsom 

INVESTED FUNDS. 

A. L. CLARKE, Chairman. 
J. N. Clarke Samuel Alexander* 



A. E. Turner 



TEACHERS. 

W. N. Fiiscn 



J. N. Clarke 



W. F. uuchanan 



FINANCE. 
P. L. Johnson 



Fred Pease 



RE.PAI.RS AND IMPROVEIVIENTS. 
Oswald Oliver G. H. Pratt A. L. Clarke 

GROUNDS. 



a. H. Prait 



P. L. Johnson 



J. N. Clarke 



Osv/ald Oliver 



BUiLDlNG 



J. N. Clarive 



A. E. Turner 



A. L. Clarke 
=iDeceased. 



CONSERVATORY. 



W. F. Buchanan 



A. E. Turner 



Faculty and Assistants 



ARCHELAUS EWING TURNER, Sc. D., LL.D., President. 
Professor of Political Science. 
A. B. Lincoln College, 1881; A. M., ibid., 1884; Tutor 
in Lincoln College, 1884-5; Professor of Natural Science, 
Lincoln College, 1885-8; President Lincoln College, 1888- 
1900; President Waynesburg College, 1900-04; President 
Trinity University, 1904-7; President Hastings College, 
1907—; Sc.D., Grove City College, 1903; LL.D., Cumberland 
University, 190G. 

WILLIAM NEWEL FILSON, A. B., 

Dean, Prcfesscr of Latin. 
S. B. Illinois College, 1889; A. B. ibid., 1892; Instruc- 
tor Latin and History, High School, Jacksonville, 111., 1889- 
91; Graduate Student, Yale University, 1891-92; Instructor 
in Latin, Chicago Preparatory School, 1892-93; Instructor 
of Latin and History, 1893-94; Professor of Latin from 
1894; Acting President Hastings College, 1895-96; and Jan- 
uary 1 to June, 1900. President 1900-02; Dean from 1902. 

JOHN BLAINE KLINE, Ph. B. 

Professor of Biological and Physical Sciences. 
Ph. B. Wiooster University, 1898; Principal in Hayes- 
ville, Ohio, High School, 1898-99; Instructor Biological and 
Physical Sciences Hastings College, 1900-02; Professor of' 
Biological and Physical Sciences from 1902. 

ALLEN CARPENTER, A. B. 

Professor of Mathematics. 
A. B. Hastings College, 1901; Instructor of Mathe- 
matics, Hastings College, 1901-04; Professor of Mathe- 
matics, Hastings College from 1904. 

JANET L. CARPENTER, A. M. 

Instructor in Greek. 

A. B. Hastings,, 1892; A. M., ibid., 1895; Instructor in 
Greek and Latin, Highland University, Highland, Kansas, 
1895-99; Instructor in Greek and Latin, Kansas City Uni- 
versity, 1899-OG; Instructor in English Language and Liter- 
ature, Hastings College, 1906; Instructor in Greek, Hast- 
ings College 1907 — . 



CONRAD VANDERVELDE, A. M., B. D. 

Professor of Bible and History, 
A. B. Ripon College, 1904; A. M. Princeton University, 
1906; Graduate Princeton Seminary; B. D. Princeton Sem- 
inary, 1907; Professor of Bible and History, Hastings Col- 
lege, 1907—; Student Pastor, 1908—. 

ROBERT BRIGHT WALSH, A. B. 

Professor of Modern Languages. 
A. B. State College of Kentucky, 1900; President Ash- 
land College, Ashland, Kentucky, 1900-03; Graduate Work, 
Syracuse University, Summer 1903; Professor in Chatta- 
nooga University, 1903-05; Graduate Work in Heidelberg 
and Berlin Universities, Germany, 1905-OG; Professor in 
Hastings College, 1907—. 

ALBERT GALLATIN OWEN, A. M. 

Professor of Education and Philosophy. 
A. M. Allegheny College, 1887; Professional Course 
Pennsylvania State Normal School, Pennsylvania State Life 
Certificate 1890; Nebraska State Life Certificate 1905; 
Superintendent City Schools, Tuscola, Illonois, 1892- 
98; Superintendent City Schools, Nashville, Illinois, 1898- 
1902; Supervising Principal City Schools, East St. Louis, 
Illinois, 1902-04; Principal Pawnee City Academy, Nebras- 
ka, 1904; Professor of Education, Hastings College, 1907 — . 

KATE ANNELIA CROSS, A. B. 

Instructor in English Language and Literature. 
A. B.. Ottawa University, 1900; Instructor in English 
and Latin, Western Normal College, 1901-02; Student in 
Harvard Summer School, 1902; Student in University of 
Chicago, 1907; Instructor in English, Hastings College, 
1907—. 

FAY WILSON EWING. 

Instructor in Elocution. 
University of Nebraska, 1905; Instructor in Elocution, 
Hastings College, 1907-08. 

JOHN REES, 

Professor of Instrumental Music. 
Professor of Instrumental Music, Hastings College, from 

1882. 



MARGARET AGNES BRINKEMA, 
Tutor. 

BESSE PERLE PHILLIPS, 
Tutor. 

FAY WILSON EWING, 
Librarian. 



OTHER OFFICERS. 

Rev. Harry P. Armslrong, A. B., Field Secretary. 

Pleasant L. Johnson, A. M., Treasurer. 

Anna L. Trenner, A. B., Office Secretary. 

Mrs. Mary Phillips, Matron. 

Fred A. Weise, Custodian of Buildings and Grounds. 



COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY. 

Entrance and Examination — Pres. Turner, Dean Filson, Prof. 

Owen. 
Schedule — Prof. Kline, Dean Filson. 
Athletics — Prof. Kline, Prof. Carpenter, Mr. Johnson. 
Library — Miss Ewing, Prof. Vandervekle, Prof. Carpenter, 
Course of Study — Prof. Kline, Miss Carpenter, Prof. Owen. 
Discipline — Pres. Turner, Dean Filson, Prof Kline. 
Public Exercises — Miss Carpenter, Miss Ewing, Prof. Rees. 
Catalogue and Quarterly Bulletin — Pres. Turner, Dean Filson, 

Miss Carpenter, Mr. Johnson. 
Student Publications — Prof. Vandervelde, Miss Cross, Prof. 

Oari)enter. 
Student Organizations — ?Jiss Carpenter, Miss Ewing, Prof. 

Vandervelde. 







W 
U 

H 

u 
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I— I 






General Information 



ORGANIZATION. 

As early as 1873 the Presbyterians of Hastings were seri- 
ously considering the establishment of a college. The matter 
was favorably considered by Kearney Presbytery in November 
of that year and a committee was appointed to receive dona- 
tions and take the necessary steps toward founding the insti- 
tution. During the next eight or nine years the records show 
that the matter was still under consideration and, although 
financial conditions proved very trying, the citizens of Hast- 
ing kept alive their interest and were undaunted in their 
purpose. 

The College was opened for the work of instruction in 
September, 18S2, Rev. W. F. Ringland, D. D., being ils frst 
president. Cyrus McCcrmick gave $5,000 for the erection of the 
building bearing his name, which v/as completed in 1884. The 
total cost of this building was $14,703.00 and it has been in 
constant use for general college purposes until the present 
time. It is now proposed to locate the Conservatory of Music 
on the second ficor of this building and the ccllege work 
which has been done there will be transferred to the new 
Carnegie building. Ringland Hall was erected in 1885 and has 
been used for library purposes, recitation rooms, business 
ofTices, and a mien's dormitory. The new dormitory for young 
.women, which was completed in 1907, is called Alexander 
Hall, in honor of Samuel Alexander, for many years a trustee 
and an active supporter of the institution. A building for sci- 
ence and library purposes, for which the sum of $20,000.00 has 
been given by Mr. Carnegie, is in process of erection. 

Following President Ringland's resignation in 1895, Prof. 
W. N. Filson acted as president for one year. He was suc- 
ceeded by S. G. Pattison, who served four years and was suc- 
ceeded by Prof. Filson who continued in office until 1902. In 
June of that year Rev. E. Van Dyke Wight, D. D., became 
president and, upon his resignation in 1907, President A. E. 
Turner, LL.D., assumed the executive chair. 



10 CATALOGUE OP 

Hastings Cclkge is under the control of the Synod of 
Nebraslva of the Presbyterian church in the U. S. A., which 
elects annually nine trustees for a term of three years. Al- 
though Christian in character, it is not sectarian. The Articles 
of Incorporation provide that "At no time shall less than two- 
thirds of the members of the Board of Trustees be members of 
the Presbyterian Church," and this is the extent of denomina- 
tional control. 

LOCATION. 

Hastings is a beautiful and thriving city of over 12,003 
inhabitants, the county seat of Adams County, and a railroad 
center of considerable importance. It is supplied with hand- 
some public buildings, elegant residences, metropolitan stores, 
and beautiful churches. Chautauqua Park and Heartwell Park 
are well improved grounds which provide most desirable recre- 
ation during the summer season. The Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy, St. Joseph & Grand Island, Chicago & Northwestern, 
and Missouri Pacific railroads, together v>^ith three branch 
lines of the Burlington route give easy access to all parts 
of the state 'and furnish a tributary field which is not sur- 
passed, in its extent, in the entire West. There is no insti- 
tution of equal rank west of Hastings College in Nebraska 
and yet one-third of the population of the state is to be found 
in that territory. 

Because of its size and location, Plastings is able to fur- 
nish to the students of the college exceptional advantages [n 
the way of entertainments and social functions. The city 
Y. M, C. A. has a handsome new building whose privileges 
are open to our young men for a nominal consideration. This 
organization also maintains a strong lecture course each sea- 
son, and the Carnegie library greatly increases the advantages 
of this kind which may be enjoyed by college students. The 
moral atmosphere of the community is particularly wholesome 
and it would be diffiult to find a college location more nearly 
ideal in character. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS. 
Hastings College has a campus of twenty-throe acres, city 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 11 

lots in the neighborhood of the College ranounting to 3 acres 
more and back of the campus, a small farm. Mr. C. M. 
Lowrie, a landscape architect of New York, has kindly do- 
nated plans for our grounds, which, when completed, will give 
the College a beautiful campus. These plans call for a great 
many more buildings than are needed at present, but future 
growth will be along the lines marked out by Mr. Lowrie. 

There are three buildings: Ringland Hall, a dormitory 
for young men; McCormick Flail, the principal recitation build- 
ing and Alexander Hall, named in honor of Mr. Samuel Alex- 
ander, a dormitory for young women. 

A gift of $20,000 from Mr. Andrew Carnegie has made pos- 
sible the erection of the new building to be devoted to library 
and science purposes. The building is in process of erection, 
and will be ready for occupancy early in the autumn. It pro- 
vides spacious quarters for a library, laboratories and lec- 
ture rooms for the departments of Biology, Chemistry and 
Physics, and an executive office. The material is white brick 
and stone, and the building is both beautiful in architectural 
style and well adapted to the purposes for which it is erected. 
Space will also be provided for in this building for a reading 
room, for the Christian Associations, and for the literary socie- 
ties of the College. The completion of the new laboratories 
makes the scientific facilities of the College equal to those of 
the best institutions in the West. A chair of Biology will be es- 
tablished and the work of the science department thoroughly 
organized along modern lines. All students are required to 
do laboratory work under the constant supervision of the 
head of the department or his assistant. For the use of the 
apparatus, and materials consumed, each member in every 
class having special laboratory practice, is required to pay a 
fee, and to make a temporary deposit to cover breakage. 

LIBRARY. 

The library contains about G,300 volumes, and 3,000 un- 
bound magazines. A fund is being created which will enable 
the various departments to add from time to time such books 
as are necessary for reference and research. In the new 
building a stack room will give easy access to books, and 



12 CATALOGUE OF 

there will be a spacious reading room, in charge of a compe 
tent librarian. A large number of the leading periodicals 
and reviews are regularly subscribed for, and it is proposed to 
make the library increasingly helpful in the work of our stu- 
dents. The more spacious quarters now available will make it 
possible to use advantageously donations of books or cash, 
and such gifts are earnestly solicited from friends of the in- 
stitution. 

DORMITORIES. 

FOR YOUNG WOMEN: A handsome and well appointed 
new building, known as Alexander Hall, is a very comfortable 
home for young women, providing accommodations for twenty- 
eight students. 

This building is heated by steam, lighted by electricity, 
and provided with sanitary plumbing. In the basement is a 
laundry where those who eo desire can do their own laundry 
work. The rooms are large and well lighted. One room is re- 
served as a rest room, and to be used in case of sickness. Ev- 
erything is done for the health and convenience of the young 
women. Each room is furnished with two bedsteads and mat- 
tresses, a wash stand and dresser, book case, table and chairs, 
and there is a separate closet for each occupant. The young 
ladies will provide their own towels, bedding, rugs, pictures, 
etc. The building is under the charge and careful supex'-vision 
of a preceptress. 

Arrangements may be made to room outside the dormi- 
tory, but this is done only at the request and permission of par- 
ents or guardian. Such rooming places must be approved by 
the President, and young^ ladies occupying them will be under 
the same supervision as those in the dormitory. 

FOR YOUNG MEN: Forty young men can be accomomdated 
in Ringland Hall. This building is provided ith steam heat, 
electric lights and sanitary plumbing. The building is under 
the charge of a preceptor. All Academy students are required 
to room in the dormitory, unless they are excused by written 
permission of parent or guardian, in which case they may 
room in the city at such places as are approved by the Presi- 
dent. Each room in Ringland Hall is provided with bedstead 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 13 

and mat4ress, wash stand and dresser, table, bookcase and 
chairs. 

BOARDING. 

For such College stiident:i as cannot find accommodations 
in the dormitories good boarding places can be provided in 
homes in the vicinity of the campus. Excellent table beard 
is provided for students in the dormitories, and as many others 
as can be accommodated at the rate of .$3.00 per week. The din- 
ing hall is located in the basement of Ringland Hall. The 
cost of living is somewhat higher in private families, except 
in cases where some service can be rendered to m.eet part of 
the cost of board. 

The self-help department has been discontinued as it was 
found to involve financial loss to the institution, and some 
what unsatisfactory results to students. A limited number 
of young men and women can be utilized in connection 
with various departments of the institution, but they will be 
employed and paid as in the case of other help. Students 
who desire to secure employment of this kind would do well 
to communicate with the President or the Treasurer as soon 
as possible after deciding to enter College. 

TUITION AND FEES. 

Tuition and fees have been reduced to the lowest cost con- 
sistent with high-grade work. The College is not therefore 
able to bear the expense of an accountant and to carry open 
accounts with students, parents, or guardians. All tuition and 
laboratory fees are due and payable in advance, and settle- 
ments must be made in full within two weeks after the open- 
ing of any semester. No money paid on term bills will be re- 
funded except in case of sickness, extending over a period of 
half a term or longer. No reduction is made for absence the 
first or last three weeks of term. Students entering later than 
the third week will be charged tuition in proportion to the 
time of attendance. Students taking less than eight periods 
of work will be charged a half rate of tuition. A half rate is 
also made to ministerial students, and sons and daughters 



14 CATALOGUE OF 

of ministers. There are no incidental fees, except that fifteen 
cents per week is charged young women for the use of the 
laundry. 

The rates indicated in the following table are based upon 
com.parison with the fees of ten other representative colleges 
in the middle West. The charge for tuition is $8.00 less than 
the average rate of these other schools. 

Tuition, per semester, $25; for the year $ 50.00 

Boarding at Ringland Hall, $3.00 per week 108.00 

Room rent, heat and light, Ringland Hall 30.00 

Room rent, heat and light, Alexander Hall 36.00 



Total in Ringland Hall $188.00 

Total in Alexander Hall 194.00 

In all cases there must he added the expense of books, 
laboratory fees, laundry and other personal items, which vary 
with circumtances. 

Laboratory Fees. 

Rates per semester, or one-half school year. 

College Chemistry $3.00 

Academic Chemistry 2.50 

Biology , 2.25 

Breakage Deposit (College) for the year 2.00 

Breakage Deposit (Academy) for the year 1.50 

Conservatory of Music. 

Rates per semester, or one-half school year. 

Vocal culture, violin, piano forte, pipe organ $3 4.00 

Harmony 15.00 

Chorus work or sight singing 3.00 

Use of piano for practice, one period a day 5.00 

CO-EDUCATION. 

From the beginning, the College has been co-eduoational, 
and a history of twenty-six years has fully justified the wis- 

Note — Students taking private lessons in two or more 
courses in music will be allowed to take one course in the 
liu-rary department without extra charge. 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 15 

dom of this policy. We believe there is no good reason why 
young women should net enjoy the same advantages and 
opportunities as these offered by the various colleges of the 
country to young men. (The contact of students of both sexes 
in the class room and general college exercises has proved 
to be a source of mutual restraint and inspiration. In order 
that this association may prove as helpful as possible, the 
Faculty undertakes to provide and supervise frequent social 
functions, the most important being the semi-annual recep- 
tions which are held near the beginning of the two seme.^ters. 

RELIGIOUS INFLUENCES. 

While the College is managed and fostered by the Pres- 
byterian Church, it is entirely non-sectarian in its training. 
It makes no attempt to disguise the fact that it is positively 
Christian, and seeks to supply to young persons in their earlier 
years the influences which are believed to be necessary in 
order to counteract tendencievS toward disbelief in those things 
which are regarded as indispensable to the shaping of Chris- 
tian life and character. For this reason, the study of the 
Bible is required during the entire course, it being assumed 
that the Bible is a divine revelation, and that nothing will 
so surely establish this proposition as a careful and scien- 
tific study of the book. The members of the Faculty are 
men and women of Christian culture and active religious 
influence. Attendance at daily chapel exercises is required of 
all students and, under careful management, these services 
have proved to be a strong inspirational feature of college 
work. The Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. hold weekly 
prayer meetings, to which all students are invited. Students 
are also required to attend church services and are advised 
to attend the church preferred by parents or guardians. 

Especially helpful religious influences are furnished to 
our students through the employment of a student pastor 
This arrangement has been made with the co-operation of the 
First /Presbyterian Church of Hastings. The congregation 
undertakes to provide the salary of one member of the Faculty, 
who is appointed by the Trustees with the concurrence of the 
session of the church, as student pastor. For the present this 



16 CATALOGUE OF 

responsible position is held by Prof. Vandervelde, of the 
department of Bible and History. Another helpful feature is 
the Y. M. C. A. organization of the city, which has a handsome, 
well appointed new building, the advantages of which are 
open to our students upon the payment of a nominal fee. The 
physical director of the Y. M. C. A. is also employed to super- 
vise College athletics and the relations between the two insti- 
tutions are of the most intimate and helpful character. It is 
the purpose of the College in every way to make it easy for 
a student to do right and difficult for him to do wrong. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS. 

Admission to the College — Persons seeking admission to 
the College must be of upright, moral character. They may 
be admitted to the Freshmian Class by presenting a certificate 
cf graduation from the Academ.y, by passing an exp.mination 
in the branches offered in the Academy, or by furnishing 
credentials for such work from any high school which is in- 
cluded in the accredited list of the University of Nebraska. 
A list of such schools will be found farther on. Students 
coming from high schools that offer work equivalent in time 
find discipline to the courses offered in our Academy but not 
corresponding to them, will be admitted to the Freshman class. 
Tn case such students are not fitted to carry the work of 
that year and are obliged to take some preparatory courses, 
pnrtial credit will be given for such work. 

Admission Under Conditions — Students may be admitted 
to the various college classes, provided the work with w^hich 
they are credited does not differ from the work in the course 
preceding the year they wish to enter by more than the fol- 
ing number of units:* 

For admission to the Freshman class 2 units 

For admission to the Sophomore class IV^ units 

For admission to the Junior class 1 unit 

For admission to the Senior class V2 ^^"it 

*A unit of work is the work necessary for five recitations 
a weelc throughout the semester. 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 17 

Registration — At the beginning of each semester students 
ar-: required to register for the branches which they expect 
to study during the semester. No student will be allowed 
to register for more than the full amount of work without 
special permission of the Faculty. Members of the Faculty 
will be found in their class rooms on Tuesday, Sept, 8th. All 
registrations for irregular courses are subject to the approval 
of the Faculty. Permission to abandon a course after com- 
mencing it, or to take up a course which has not been begun, 
must be secured through the Dean of the College. 

Depcrtment — It is expected that all students will conduct 
themselves as ladies and gentlemen, and no specific rules of 
conduct are prescribed, except as the necessity for them arises. 
Admission to the College pledges all students to implicit 
obedience to such regulations as are found necessary, whether 
published in the catalogue or announced orally by the presi- 
dent, and to regular attendance upon recitations, including 
preparation for the same. The best possible improvement 
of time and means is expected of all students. If in any case 
a student fails to meet these expectations he may be called 
before the Discipline Committee for admonition. If this ad- 
monition be not heeded, he may then be summoned before the 
Faculty, and such citation involves the recording of a delin- 
quency against him. Three such citations before the Faculty 
will work the suspension of the student without further action. 

Amount of Work — The number of recitations required per 
week of each student is sixteen, and this number of recitations 
per week for one semster constitutes sixteen credit hours. One 
hundred and twenty-eight credit hours are required for gradu- 
ation. Special permission of the Faculty is required to enable 
the student to carry work in excess of the prescribed number 
of hours. 

Attendance upon Classes — Regular attendance upon class 
exercises is required and the grade of students who absent 
themselves from recitations will be affected by these absences. 
Excuses for absence are to be rendered to the individual in- 
structors, except that absence from public services on Sabbath 
are to be rendered to the Dean. In this connection the 
attention of patrons is called to the fact that frequent visits 
home or elsewhere during the session are likely to prove det- 



18 ^ CATALOGUE OF 

rimental by interfering with regular habits of study, thereby 
putting the student at a disadvantage n his classes. Parents 
are asked to co-operate with the Faculty in reducing the num- 
ber of such absences. 

Leaving School — It is expected that students who desire 
to leave town while classes are in session will secure the per- 
mission of the Dean. Failure to do so may be made a matter 
of discipline. Any student leaving the College permanently 
before the time for which he matriculated has expired, without 
the permission of the Faculty, shall be subject to discipline. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Hastings College grants the following scholarships: 

1. We unite with other colleges of the state in granting 
to the graduate in each high school and academy having the 
highest standing the sum of $25.00 'per year for four years, 
making a total of $100. 

2. Mrs. W. J. Bryan's scholarship for young ladies, free 
tuition. The student receiving this scholarship is expected 
to refund the money, without interest, after completing the 
work in the school. The money thus refunded is used to estab- 
lish another scholarship. 

3. The John Converse scholarships for ministerial students. 
Free tuition to two young men studying for the ministry. 

4. To all students expecting to enter the ministry, a schol- 
arship of one-half tuition. 

5. To sons and daughters of ministers, one-half tuition, or 
$25.00 per year. 

0. Horace B. Silliman has giren $1,000.00 to the Presby- 
terian College Board, the interest of which is to be used for 
a scholarship awarded by the Faculty. 

7. (We are raising a fund of $25,000, the interest of which 
is to be used for the sons and daughters of home missionaries. 
Only a small portion is as yet secured, but we can provide 
free tuition for a limited number. 

Application for the Bryan, Converse and Silliman scholar- 
ships should be made to the Faculty not later than May 15 of 
the preceding year. 

CERTIFICATES. 

A certificate of graduation will be given to those who 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 



19 



have satisfactorily pursued the studies in the Academy. This 
will admit the holder to the Freshman class without further 
examination. 

First Grade Teachers' Certificates will be given to gradu- 
ates of the College who take special electives for teachers 
offered in the Junior and Senior years. 

A certificate of proficiency will be awarded to each student 
who completes a course offered in the Conservatory of Music. 



ACCREDITED SCHOOLS. 



Albion 

Alliance 

Alma 

Am. School, Mex. 

Arapahoe 

Ashland 

Auburn 

Aurora 

Beatrice 

Beaver City 

Bellevue Academy 

Blair 

Bloomington 

Blue Hill 

Blue S'prings 

Broken Bow 

Brownell Hall 

Butte, Mont. 

Cedar Rapids 

Central City 

Chadron 

Chadron Academy 

Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Columbus 

Cotner Uni. Acad. 

Crawford 



FOUR YEAR LIST. 

Hartington 

Harvard 

Hastings 

Hastings Col. Acad. 

Havelock 

Hebron 

Hiawatha, Kans. 

Holdrege . . 

Humboldt 

Kearney 

Lead, S. D. 

Lexington 

Leadville, Colo. 

Lincoln 

Lincoln Academy 

Little Rock, Ark. 

Luther Academy 

McCook 

Madison 

Mankato, Kans. 

Marysville, Kans. 

Minden 

Missoula, Mont. 

Gothenburg 

Grand Island 

Great Falls, Mont. 



Pawnee City 

Pawnee City Acad. 

Pierce 

Plainview 

Plattsmouth 

Ponca 

Randolph 

Red Cloud 

Red Oak, Iowa 

Sacred Heart Acad. 

St. Catherine's Acad. 

St. Francis Acad,, la. 

St. Paul 

St.TheresaPar'l Schl 

Schuyler 

Seward 

Shelton 

South Omaha 

Spalding Academy 

Stanton 

Stromsburg 

Superior 

Sutton 

Syracuse 

Table Rock 

Tecuseh 



20 



CATALOGUE OP 



Creighton 

Creighton Uni.Acad. 
Crete 

David City 
Deadwood, S. D. 
Edgar 
Exeter 
Fairbury 
Fairfield 
Fairmont 
Falls City 
Franklin Academy 
Fremont 
Friend 
Fullerton 
Gates Academy 
Geneva 



Bancroft 

Battle Creek 

Beaver Crossing 

Beemer 

Bertrand 

Bloomfield 

Cambridge 

Clarks 

Clay Center 

Cozad 

DeWitt 

Elwood 

Florence 

Franklin 

Genoa 



Mt. St. Mary's Sem. 

Nebraska City 

Neligh 

Nelson 

Norfolk 

North Bend 

North Platte 

Oakland 

Ohiowa 

Oklahoma Cy, Okla. 

Omaha 

O'Neill 

Ord 

Oregon, Mo. 

Orleans Seminary 

Ottawa, Kansas, 

Osceola 

THREE YEAR LIST. 

Gibbon 

Grafton 

Greeley 

Herman 

Hooper 

Laurel 

Louisville 

Loup City 

Lyons 

Neb. Institute Blind 

Newman Grove 

Oakdale 

Orleans 

Oxford 

Papillion 



Tekamah 

Ulysses 

University Place 

Valley 

Wahoo 

Wakefield 

Wiayne 

Weeping Water 

Weeping Wtr. Acad. 

Neb. Wesleyan Acad 

West Point 

Wilber 

Wisner 

Wood River 

Wymore 

York 



Pender 

Ravenna 

St. Edward 

Scribner 

Sidney 

Spencer 

Springfield 

Stella 

Stratton 

Tilden 

Tobias 

Valentine 

Wausa 

Western 



COIURSES AND DEGREES. 

There are two full courses in the College of Liberal Arts, 
the Classical Course leading to the degree of A. B., and the 
Scientific Course leading to the degree of B. S. 

The College is empowered to confer certain honorary de- 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 21 

grees, but its policy is to use this privilege sparingly. The 
Board of Trustees limits the number of such honorary degrees 
that may be granted to ten per cent of the number of degrees 
issued in course by the College. 

PROFESSIONAL TRAINING FOR TEACHERS. 

The demand for professionally trained teachers of high 
scholastic attainments is greater than the supply. Recognizing 
this demand, Hastings College, through its Department of 
Education, offers to those who expect to teach such professional 
training as is required by the state of Nebraska for the highest 
grade of certificate. 

Students graduating from the College with the degree of 
bachelor of arts or bachelor of science who have completed 
the courses in education elsewhere outlined, receive, by au- 
thority of the state, the following certificates: 

First Grade State Teachers' Certificate. 

This is to certify that who was graduated 

from Hastings College in the year with the degree of 

and has successfully completed, in addition to 

other studies, the requirements of the Teachers' Course of 
Hastings College, consisting of two years of special and pro- 
fessional study, is qualified to teach in any public schools 
of the state of Nebraska without further examination for a 
period of three years, in accordance with Section la. Subdi- 
vision IX, School Laws of Nebraska for 1905; and is recom- 
mended as especially fitted to teach 

In testimony whereof we have hereunto set our hands and 

caused the seal of Hastings College to be afRxed at 

Nebraska, this day of 190 .... 

President 

Secretary 



Professional State Certificate. 

Upon satisfactory evidence that the teaching service of.... 
has been successful, in accordance with 



22 CATALOGUE OF 

Section lb, Subdivision IX, School Laws of Nebraska for 1905, 

I hereby countersign the attached certificate this day 

of 190.., and declare the said certificate 

to be permanent unless annulled upon satisfactory evidence of 
disqualification. 



State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
Those who do not wish to take the College course but 
desire to obtain first and second grade certificates can take 
the Special Training course provided by the electives in the 
Junior and Senior years of the Academy. This course is out- 
lined elsewhere in this catalogue under "Special Normal 
Training Course." 



PRIZES. 

1. Junior essay prize of $15.00, yielded by an endowment 
given for the purpose by Rev. D. S. Schaff, D. D., to that mem- 
ber of the Junior class writing the best essay during the 
year. There must be at least three contestants. 

2. Biblical Oratorical Contest. Two prizes of $15.00 and 
$10.00 given by Rev. J. B. Currens of Omaha to the two suc- 
cesssful contestants in oratory. The subjects of these orations 
are limited to heroes of the Bible. 

ENDOWMENT. 

During the last few years much attention has been given 
by the Trustees to securing an endowment. Six years 
ago a committee was appointed and the first $50,000 was 
raised. Dr. D. K. Pearsons then offered $10,000 on condition 
that this amount be pushed to $100,000. This effort was 
brought to a successful completion in 1906, and the College 
now has $100,000 in invested funds and notes. Friends of higher 
education in general and Christian education in particular 
should awaken to the responsibility, or rather realize the op- 
portunity in supporting and endowing Hastings College. Bstnb- 
lished at the very frontier, it is better fitted than any other 
institution to train for the regions west, its ministers and teach- 
ers, and to raise up missionaries for the home and foreign 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 23 

field. It is a college that is building for Christian education 
in central and western Nebraska. We earnestly solicit the 
help of all friends. 

A most helpful agency in this direction has been the 
Hastings College Society, a voluntary organization whose mem- 
bers agree to contribute each year the sum of $10.00 to be 
applied on the running expenses of the college. There are 
now nearly 300 members in the Society and the number is 
constantly increasing. 



The College 



COURSES OF STUDY. 

The capital letter preceding the elective marks the courses. 
Those selecting A in the Sophomore year will be expected 
to elect one of the A courses in the Junior and Senior years. 
The numeral which follows branches corresponds to the num- 
ber in the statement of courses under such department. 



Classical. 



Scientific. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



1st and 2nd Semesters, 
hrs. hrs. 
Bible 1 3 

Elocution 111 
English 1 4 

Greek 1 4 5 

Latin 1 4 4 

Trigonometry 14 
Anal. Geom. 10 4 



17 17 



1st and 2nd 


Semesters 




hrs. 


hrs. 


Bible 1 





3 


Elocution 1 


1 


1 


English 1 


4 





German 1 






(or French) 


5 


5 


Chemistry 1 


3 


3 


Trigonometry 1 


4 





Anal. Geom. 1 





4 



17 16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



1st and 2nd Semesters, 
hrs. hrs. 



Bible 2 
Biology 2 
Physiology 3 
Elocution 2 
Greek 2 

History 1 
History 2 



Electives 



3 
3 

1 
4 

3 


14 





3 
1 
4 


3 

11 
5 or 



17 IG 



17 



1st and 2nd 


Semesters. 




hrs. 


hrs. 


Bible 2 


3 





Biology 2 


3 





Physiology 3 





3 


Elocution 2 


1 


1 


German 2 






(or French) 


4 


4 


History 1 


3 


' 


History 2 





3 




14 


11 


Eloclives 


3 


5 or 6 



17 16 



17 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 



25 



JUNIOR YEAR. 



1st and 


2nd 


Semesters 






hrs. 


hrs. 


Bible 3 




3 





Psychology 


1 


O 


3 


Logic 2 







2 


Greek 3 




4 


4 






10 


9 


Electives 




6 


7 



16 16 



1st and 2nd Semesters, 
hrs. hrs. 



Bible 3 
Psychology 1 
Logic 2 
Physics 4 



Electives 



3 
3 

4 

10 
6 




3 
2 
4 

9 

7 



16 16 



SENIOR YEAR. 



1st and 2nd Semesters, 
hrs. hrs. 
Evidences 3 
Ethics 4 
Economics 1 
Philosophy 5 



Electives 



o 








3 


4 








4 


7 


7 


9 


9 



16 16 



1st and 2nd Semesters, 
hrs, hrs. 



Evidences 3 
Ethics 4 


3 





3 


Economics 1 
Philosophy 5 


4 




4 


Electives 


7 
9 


7 
9 




16 


16 



ELECTIVES. 



Biblical Department. 

hrs. hrs. 
Bible 4 11 

EducalVi'on Department. 

hrs. hrs. 



Course 
Course 
Course 
Course 
Cour.«e 



o 
o 




3 

4 3 

5 

6 
English Department. 

Course 2 (Old English 
and Chaucer) 

Course 3 

(Shakespeare) 3 

Course 4 (English Lit- 
erature, (1744-1832) 3 

Course 5 (19th Cent. 
English Lit.) 



4 
3 

3 







History 
Course 3 
Course ^4 
Course 5 
Course 6 

Greek 
Greek 4a 
Greek 4b 

Mathematics. 
Mathem.atics 3 
Mathematics 
Mathematics 
Mathematics 



Department. 

3 
3 


Department. 
3 




4 
5 
6 



3 







Latin. 



Course 
Course 
Course 



4 


3 

|2 



3 
3 
3 



3 


3 


3 


4 
3 
2 



3 
3 
3 



26 



CATALOGUE OF 



ELECTIVES. (Continued) 



Course 6 (Tennyson) 3 

Course 7 (Amer. Lit.) 3 

Modern Languages. 

French 1 (CI.) 5 5 

French 2 (CI.) 4 4 

German A 1 (CI.) 5 5 

German A 2 (CI.) 5 5 

German 1 (CI.) 5 5 

German 3 3 



Science. 

Course 1 (CI.) 3 

Course 4 (CI.) 4 

Course 5 2 
Political Science. 

Course 2 3 

Course 3 



3 

4 

2 



o 



OUTLINE OF COURSES. 

In the following statements of courses the numbers cor- 
respond to the numbers in the preceding course of study. 



BIBLE. 

Professor Vandervelde, 

Bible L Bible History. Freshman year, 3 hours, 2nd semes- 
ter. This consists of a more thorough and critical study than 
that given in the Academy. The Scripture accounts are com- 
pared with secular history and the present scientific conclu- 
sions. Material is added from every outside source possible and 
topics for investigation are assigned. Smith's Old Testament 
History and Blaikie's Bible History are the texts. 

Bible 2. Life of Christ. Sophomore year, three hours, first 
semester. The study of the Gcspels in a more critical way than 
that in the Academy. The customs of the times, the political 
situation, the doctrinal implications, and the Synoptic and Jo- 
hannine view points are used to throw light upon the life of 
Christ and to enable the student to interpret the records. The 
miracles are studied from an apologetic point of view. 

Bible 3, Apostolic History, Junior year, three hours, first 
semester. This consists of a study of the progress of Chris- 
tianity from the Ascension until the death of the last Apostle. 
The conditions, favorable and unfavorable to the piomotion of 
the new religion, are studied in connection vv^ith the missionary 
journeys of Paul, which are carefully traced. The epistles are 
fitted into the narrative in their chronological order and 
studied in their i)roper setting. 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 27 

Bible 4. Elective. One hour, one year (Sunday.) If a 
sufficient number of students desire to select some course in 
the Pentateuch, the Poetical Books, or the Prophets, a class will 
be organized to meet Sundays. The instructor reserves the 
right to exclude any whom he thinks unprepared to take the 
work or to limit the class to a small number. 

Note — Students entering the Senior year of the College will 
be required to take one of the courses offered in Bible study. 

BIOLOGICAL AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES. 

Profe&sor Kline. 

1. Advanced Chemistry, Three hours, entire year. Re- 
quired of scientific Freshman and elective to classical students 
having had required amount of elementary chemistry. Two 
laboratory periods a week will be devoted to qualitative analy- 
sis in which the analysis of all common metals and acids will 
be taken up, various salts and common minerals being given 
for test work. One recitation a week will be given to discus- 
sion of laboratory results and review of basic principles of 
chemistry. Text — Noyes. Qualitative Analysis. 

2. Elementary Biology. Three hours, first semester. Re- 
quired of Sophomores. iThe object of this course is to acquaint 
the student with a general survey of the life kingdom. Begin- 
ning with the lowest unicellular organisms, all the different 
types of life, both plant and animal, will be studied, finishing 
with the dissection of a vertebrate. So far as possible micro- 
scopic work and dissections will supplement the text book. 
Text — Parker's Elemental Biology, 

3. Physiology. Three hours, second semester. Required 
cf Sophomores, The work in Physiology will be preceded by 
dissection of a vertebrate and an examination of a human skel- 
eton. Following this a study of the microscopic structure of 
the tissues and a study of the body functions will be taken up as 
presented in Thornton's Human Physiology. 

4. Advanced Physics. Four hours, entire year. Required 
of scientific Juniors and elective to classical students. This 
course is taken by Juniors and Senior. 

5. Geology. Two hours, entire year. Elective, open to 



28 CATALOGUE OF 

Juniors and Seniors. Athough the vicinity is devoid of surface 
rocks, a collection of minerals and common rocks, to which addi- 
tions are being made, is available for students' study. 

EDUCATION. 

Professor Owen. 

The aim of the courses in this department is to secure the 
best compi-ehension of the philosophy, methods and results of 
modern pedagogy, and of the ultimate ends of education. 

1. Systematic and Applied Psychology. The purpose of 
this course is to give the student a comprehensive view of 
psychic life, dealing with vital questions of physiological psy- 
chology, self-consciousness, relation of the faculties of per- 
ception, memory, imagination, etc., nature and significance of 
emotions. Instinct and will, and finally, the application of the 
principles of systematic psychology to the art of teaching. 
James, Dexter and Garlick and other late texts. Junior or Sen- 
ior, three hours, entire year. 

2. Child Study. Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals of Child 
Study. This course is supplemental to the course in system- 
atic and applied psychology. The facts of childhood and 
the nature and developm.ent of early psychic life as far as 
scientifically known are presented and discussed, the aim being 
to awaken a proper attitude of mind for observation and ex- 
perimentation, and to furnish a safe guide in dealing with 
the development of child mind. A number of supplementary 
texts are consulted in research work. Junior or Senior year, 
four hours, second semester. 

3. History of Education. Monroe's Textbook in the His- 
tory of Education. This course traces the development of edu- 
cation from primitive life to the present complex environment 
of modern civilization. The text is supplemented by research 
v/ork, reports and discussions. Junior or Senior, 3 hours, en- 
lire year. 

4. Philosophy of Education. Home's The Philosophy of 
Education. The 'pur])0se of this course is to present the scien- 
tific phase of education, dealing successively with the biolog- 
ical, physiological, sociological, psychological and philosoph- 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 29 

ical aspects of the subject, making clear to the student the edu- 
caticiial significance of the various lines of knowledge. Senior 
or Junior, three hours, first semester. 

5. Philosophy of Teaching and Management. In this 
course the aim is the application of the philosophy of education 
to the teaching process. The nature and elements of the 
teaching process, the aim in teaching, the universal law under- 
lying method, and the fundam.ental law of management are 
among the subjects studied and discussed. Tompkins' Philos- 
ophy of Teaching and Management and McMurry's Elements 
of general method are two of the texts used. Junior or Senior, 
three hours, second semester. 

G. Methodology. Broadly speaking the purpose of this 
course is the practical application cf the principles of peda- 
gogy to the work of administration, supervision, and teaching. 
The principal subjects offered are: The Method of the Recitation, 
Special Method in Common School Studies, Special Method in 
Secondary School Studies, Administration, and Supervision. 
Junior or Senior, three hours, first semester. 

ENGLISH. 

Miss Cross, 

Each candidate for the Freshman class will be required 
to write a few paragraphs on topics chosen from the following 
works: 

Required for careful study: Burke's Speech on Concilia- 
tion with America, Macaulay's Essays on Addison and John- 
son, Milton's L'Allegro, II Penscroso, Coraus, and Lycidas, 
Shakespeare's Julius Caesar. 

Required for general reading: Addison and Steele's Sir 
Roger de Coverly Papers, Coleridge's Ancient Mariner, George 
Eliot's Silas Marner, Irving's Life of Goldsmith, Lowell's Vision 
of Sir Launfal, Scott's Ivanhoe and The Lady of the Lake, 
Shakespeare's Macbeth and The Merchant of Venice, Tenny- 
son's Gareth and Lynette, Lancelot and Elaine, and the Passing 
of Arthur. 

This examination is to test not only the candidate's knowl- 
edge of the subject matter and style of the classics, his knowl- 



30 CATALOGUE OF 

edge of the lives and works of the best writers in English and 
American literature, but also his ability to write English that 
is correct in spelling, grammar, punctuation, paragraphing, 
diction, and style. 

1. Rhetoric and Composition. A study of Baldwin's Col 
lege Manual of Rhetoric with collateral reading of textbooks 
and classics; recitations, daily writing, and conferences. Four 
hours, fall semester, required of all Freshmen. 

The following courses are open to those students only that 
have completed English 1, 

2. Old English and Chaucer. (a) Grammar and easy 
reading in Bright's Anglo Saxon Reader, (b) Poetry: Beo- 
wulf with study of meter and of the literary characteristics 
of Old English poetry, (c) Chaucer: The reading of the 
Prologue, four tales, and a few lyrics. Five hours, one semes- 
ter. 

3. Shakespeare. Lectures and recitations upon the his- 
tory of the English drama up to the seventeenth century, the 
life and times of Shakespeare, and the technique of the drama_ 
The reading and interpretation of A Midsummer Night's 
Dream, As You Like It, I Henry IV, Hamlet, King Lear, and The 
Tempest, with special attention to the development of Shake- 
speare as a dramatist. Weekly written criticisms and one sem- 
ester thesis are required. Three hours, one semester. 

4. English Literature, 1744-1832. A study of the Romantic 
Movement. Lectures and recitations. Weekly criticisms and 
one semester thesis are required. Three hours, one semester. 

5. English Literature of the Nineteenth Century. A study 
of the different literary types as illustrated in the masterpieces 
in prose and verse. Lectures, recitations, and written reports 
on library work. Three hours, one semester. 

6. Tennyson. The reading and interpretation of repre- 
sentative poems. Fortnightly criticisms and a semester thesis 
are required. Three hours, one semester. 

7. American Literature. The history of Americal litera- 
ture. The works of the best known authors will be read, and 
lectures will be given by both instructor and students. Three 
hours, one semester. 

Reading Course. All college students will be required 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 31 

to take examination in one assigned book the first, and two 
the second semester, 

GREEK. 

Miss Carpenter. 

Course A of the Academy, or its equivalent, is required of 
all candidates for the following courses. Classical students 
are required to complete courses 1, 2 and 3. 

1. Second Year Greek. Four hours, first semester; fiv« 
hours second semester. Freshman year. 

a. Xenophon's Anabasis, Books II-IV. 

b. Homer. Four books of the Iliad. Selections from 

additional books of the Iliad or from the Odyssey. 
Text, Seymour. 

2. Four « hours. Sophomore year. 

a. Plato's Apology and Crito. 

b. Lysias. 

c. Aeschylus or Sophocles. One play. 

3. Four hours. Junior year, "' 

a, Aristophanes. One play. " • 

b, Demosthenes, 

c, Thucydides, A 

4. Three hours. Senior year. Elective. 

a. Greek Lyric Poetry, 

b. Greek Life and Institutions. 

c. History of Greek Literature. 

Courses b and c are in English and are open to any Junior 
or Senior college student. They will be given in alternate 
years. Course b was given in 1907-1908. 

HISTORY. 

Professor Vandervelde, 

History 1. Middle Ages. Required of Sophomores, three 
hours, first semester. A study of European history from the 
fall of Rome until the Reformation. This includes the bar- 
barian invasion and its effect upon the development of civili- 
zation, the growth of the power of the Church and its conflict 



32 CATALOGUE OF 

with secular power, the crusades and their influence in bring- 
ing about the revival of learning. Text, assigned readings and 
theses. 

History 2. Modern Age. Required of Sophomores. Three 
hours, second semester. Prerequisite, History 1. This is a 
continuation of European history from the Reformation until 
the present time. It consists of a study of the religious reform- 
ation as an expression of the revival spirit in religion, and of 
political revolution and nation-making as an expression of the 
new awakening politically. Text, assigned readings and theses. 

History 3. The Eastern Problem. Elective, three hours, 
second semester. An historical study of the causes leading up 
to the present situation in the Far East. It includes an inves- 
tigation of the characteristics of the eastern nations, the rea- 
son for European and American interest, and the probable 
outcome. 

History 4. English History. Elective, three hours, first 
semester. Special attention is given in this course to the con- 
stitutional development of England. England's foreign rela- 
tions and her colonial policy are also emphasized. 

History 5. American History. Elective, three hours, first 
semester. (Omitted in 1908-09). This treats of the forma- 
tion of the union from a constitutional point of view, from 
1787 to 1829. 

History 6. American History. Elective, three hours, 
second semester. (Omitted 1908-09). Same as History 5 in 
its general character but covering the period from 1829 to 
]876. Pre-requisite, History 5 

LATIN. 

Professor Filson. 

1. Readings from Cicero's de Senectuete, De Amicitae, Sal- 
lust's Jugurtha. Miller's Prose Composition, Hale & Buck's 
Grammar. Four hours, entire year. Required of classicals. 

2. Roman lyrics and the drama. Three hours, entire year. 
Elective. 

3. Roman History. Three hours, entire year. Elective. 

4. Rhetorical treatises. Three hours, entire year. Elee- 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 33 

tive. One course only of the above electives can be given 
each year. 

MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY. 
Professor Carpenter. 

1. Trigonometry. Four hours, first semester. Required 
of Freshmen. Trigonometric functions and their relations, use 
of tables, solution of triangles and applications. Prerequisites: 
al, a2, a3. 

2. Analytic Geometry. Four hours, second semester. Re- 
quired of Freshmen. Conic sections, general equations of tne 
second degree, a few of the higher plane curves, and an intro- 
duction to Solid Analytical Geometry. Prerequisites: al, a2, 
a3. 1. 

3. College Algebra. Four hours, first semester. Elective, 
open to Freshmen and Sophomores. Rapid review^ of funda- 
mental principles and careful study of more advanced theories, 
including permutations and combinations, binomial and multi- 
nomial theorems, convergency and divergency of series, de- 
terminants, etc. Prerequisites: al, a2, a3, 1. 

5. Calculus. Three hours, entire year. Elective, open to 
to Freshmen and Sophomores. Methods and iprinciples of the 
Differential Calculus, together w^ith their practical application. 
Prerequisites: al, a2, a3, and 1, 2, 3. 

5. Calculus. Three hours entire year. Elective, open to 
Juniors and Seniors. Advanced Differential and Integral Cal- 
culus and an introduction to Differential Equations. Pre- 
requisites: All preceding courses. 

G. Astronomy. Two hours, entire year. Elective, open to 
Juniors and Seniors. Descriptive Astronomy with numerous 
problems. Prerequisites: Physics, Chemistry and all Math- 
ematics but 3, 4, and 5. 

MODERN LANGUAGES. 

Professor Walsh. 
FRENCH. 

1. First Semester: Elements of grammar and exercises 



34 CATALOGUE OF 

in memorizing. Drill on pronunciation and forms. Selections 
fromSuper's Preparatory French Reader. 

Second Semester: Grammar, prose composition and mem- 
orizing. Trois Contes Choisis (Daudet), Historiettes Modernes 
(Foimtaine),Coliimba (Merimee). Oral use of language intro- 
duced. Texts, Chardenal's Complete French Course. 

2. First Semester. Hugo's Hermani, Dumas' Les Trois 
Mousquetaires, with paraphrasing from texts. Prose composi- 
tion. Oral use of the language increased. 

Second Semester: Rostand's Cj'rano de Bergerac; George 
Sand's LaPetite Fadette; one collateral selection. Prose com- 
position. 

GERMAN. 

Al. First Semester: Rudiments of grammar with ex- 
ercises. Memorizing and drill on pronunciation. Selections 
from German reader. Five hours. 

Second Semester: German paraphrasing from reader. Oral 
use of language introduced. Reading from Gluck Auf, Storm's 
Immensee, Hillern's Hoher als die Kirche, Schiller's Neffe als 
Onkel. Prose composition. Five hours. 

Texts: (Thomas' German Grammar, Hatfield's Materials 
for German Composition. Other texts optional. 

A2. First Semester: Grammar. Paraphrasing from texts. 
Schiller's Tell or Maria Stuart, Goethe's Hermann und Doro- 
thea or Dichtung und Wahrheit. Prose composition. Oral use 
of the language increased. Five hours. 

Second Semester: Lessina'p, Minna von Barnhelm or 
Nathan der Weise, Freitag's Goll und aben or Die Journal- 
isten. Prose Composition, grammar, and paraphrasing from 
texts. Five hours. 

Texts: Harris' Prose Composition. Others optional. 

1_ First Semester: German poetry based on "Lyrics and 
P.allads." Colloquial German. Oral use of language practically 
exclusive. Four hours. 

Second Semester: Schiller's Wallenstein, and Heine's 
Harzreise. Colloquial German. Prose composition. Four hours. 

U. iFirst Semester: Modern German. Hauptmann, Suder- 
mann, Wildenbruch. Lectures on German literature of today. 
Three hours. 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 35 

Second Semester: Selections from Grillparzer, Scheffel, 
Kloist, and others. Three hours. 

III. First Semester: Goethe's Faust, Part I, studied in 
relation to the author's life, sources of subject-matter, and 
literary significance. 

Second Semester: Continuation of same course. Goethe's 
Faust, Part II. 



PHILOSOPHY. 

Professor Vandervelde. 

1. Psycholcgy. (See Course 1, Educational Department). 
Juniors. 

2. Logic. Required of Juniors. Two hours, second semes- 
tor, a. Historical. Logic of the Greeks, logic during the 
Middle Ages, logic of Bacon, modern logic dealing with the 
main conceptions of modern logical theory, b. An investiga- 
tion of intelligence as a knowing function. Text, Creightoi/., 
with Aiken, Mill, Jevons, Bain and others as references. 

3. Evidences. Required of Seniors. Three hours, first 
semester. (Theism and Christian Evidences. The philosophical 
and scientific defense of the Christian religion. Text, Fisher; 
collateral, V/'right's Scientific Aspects of Christian Evidences. 

4. Ethics. Required of Seniors. Three hours, second 
semester. The ground of obligation. A treatment of duty and 
conduct from the sociological, scientific, and philosophical 
points of view. Thilly, Martensen, Calderwood, Mackenzie and 
Spencer for reference. 

5. History of Philosophy. Required of Seniors. Four 
hours, second sem.ester. An outline view, through historical 
and critical study, of the important movements in philosophical 
thought, stressing the origin and development of the funda- 
mental problems and the progress toward their solution. 

Texts: Watson's Outline of Philosophy, Weber's History 
of Philosophy, Roger's Brief Introduction to Modern Philos- 
ophy. From time to time individual students are called upon 
to make special research in various 'phases of the subject and 
report their results in class. 



36 ' CATALOGUE OF 

POLITICAL SCIENCE. 

President Turner. 

1. Principles of Economics. Required of Seniors. Pour 
hours, first semester. The fundamental principles of economics 
and their bearing upon politics and 'business. A preparation 
for independent research. Text, Seager. 

2. Comparative Government. Elective. Three hours, first 
semester. A study of the principal governments of Europe. 
Text, Wilson's State. (Omitted in 1908-09). 

3. American Government. Elective. Three hours, second 
semester. ^A critical study of American Government and its 
practical working. Bryce's American Commonwealth as basis. 
(Omitted in 1908-09). 




The Academy 



ADMISSION. 

Four years' work is offered in the Preparatory Department. 
Candidates for admission to the first year of the Academy 
must have completed the study of the common branches. 

Students registering for the first time and such others as 
are not sure of their classification must satisfy the instructors 
in whose departments they expect to register as to their ability 
to undertake the work. Opportunity for so doing will be given 
on the Tuesday ipreceding the opening of the term, when the 
several instructors will meet all incoming new students in their 
respective class rooms. No student will be entered in any 
class until satisfactory proof of his ability (grades from accred- 
ited schools, etc.) has been furnished. 

Testimonials in regard to the character and credits from 
former teachers should be presented at registration. 

Registration and Examination Day, Tuesday, September 8. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 



CLASSICAL. 



SCIENTIFIC. 



FIRST YEAR. 



1st and 

Algebra 1 
English 1 
Latin 1 



2nd Semesters. 

hrs. hrs. 
5 5 
5 5 
5 5 

15 15 



1st and 2nd 

Algebra 1 
English 1 
Latin 1 



Semesters. 

hrs. hrs. 

5 5 

5 5 

5 5 

15 15 



SECOND YEAR. 



1st and 2nd Semesters. 

hrs. hrs. 



Bible 1 
English 2 
Geoemtry 
History 1 
Latin 2 



3 
3 
5 
2 

4 




3 
5 
5 
4 



17 17 



1st and 2nd Semesters. 

hrs. hrs. 



Bible 1 
English 2 
Geoemtry 
History 1 
Latin 2 



3 
3 
5 
2 
4 




3 
5 
5 
4 



17 17 



38 



CATALOGUE OF 



THIRD YEAR. 



1st and 2nd Semesters. 

hrs. hrs. 



English 3 


3 


3 


English 3 


3 


3 


Geometry 3 


4 


4 


Geometry 3 


4 


4 


Latin 3 


5 


5 


German 1 


5 


5 


Physics 1 


4 


4 


Physics 1 


4 


4 



16 16 



FOURTH YEAR. 



1st and 2nd Semesters. 

hrs. hrs. 



16 16 



1st and 2nd Semesters. 



Bible 2 
Elocution 1 
English 4 
Greek 1 
History 2 
Latin 4 



hrs. hrs. 
3 



1 
4 
5 
3 
4 



1 
4 
5 


4 



17 17 



1st and 2nd Semesters. 



Bible 2 
Elocution 1 
English 4 
German 2 
History 2 
Chemistry 2 
Botany 3 



hrs. 


hrs. 





3 


1 


1 


4 


4 


5 


5 


3 





4 








4 



17 17 



Note. — All new students in the Academy whether regis- 
tering in the class in which a Bible course is offered or not 
will be required to take one of the Bible courses for one 
semester. 



OUTLINE OF COURSES. 

Bible. 

1. Old Testament. Three hours, first semester, second 
year. Bible used as text. The aim of this course is to give 
the student a knowledge of the history, the customs, the laws 
and government, and the providential guidance of the children 
of Israel up to the end of the line of prophets. Assigned read- 
ings in the Bible with questions directing the student to the 
essential facts brings the student to the sources of Bible his- 
tory. The course covers the books of the Bible from Genesis 
to Job. 

2. New Testament. Throe hours, second semester, fourth 
year. Bil)le used as text. The life of Christ is taken up in 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 39 

chronological order, A comparison of the Gospels is made to 
discover the characteristic features of each of the books and 
the different purpose of each of the writers. The parables 
and the teachings of Christ are presented in their historical 
setting. Following this is a study of the journeys and writ- 
ings of Paul with special reference to the political condition, 
the chronology, and the geography. 



English. 

Al. The work of the first year will be the study of Her- 
rick and Damon's Composition and Rhetoric, Parts I, II, III, and 
IV, and the careful reading of classics chosen from those rec- 
ommended by the committee on College Entrance Requirements 
in English. Five hours, one year. 

A 2. The work of the second year will be the study of 
Herrick and Damon's Composition and Rhetoric, Part V, and 
classics with collateral reading. Three hours, one year. 

A 3. This course will be the study of Matthew's History 
of American Literature with the careful reading of American 
classics. Weekly themes on the reading will be required. 
Three hours, one year. 

A 4. This course will be the study of Halleck's History 
of English Literature with the reading of English classics and 
a review of the principles of composition. Four hours, one 
year. 



German. 

Courses 1 and 2 are required of all students in the Scien- 
tific Course. 

Al. Elementary and Intermediate Course. :Five hours, 
third year. Lehrbuch der Deutschen Sprache, by Spanhoofs, is 
studied very carefully in the first semester and followed by 
some reader. In this work much attention is given to conver- 
sation as well as accurate translation. Short modern texts 
are read according to the selection by the instructor. 

A2. Advance'd Course. Five hours, fourth year. 
1. Mueller's Deutche Liebe. 



40 CATALOGUE OF 

2. Schiller's Das Lied von der Glocke, Wilhelm Tell, 
and Wallenstein's Tod. 

3. Freytag's Die Journalistein. 

Greek. 

Course 1 is required of all Classical students in the fourth 
year of the Academy. 

Al. Elementary Greek. Five hours, fourth year. During 
the first six months White's First Greek Book is used, with a 
careful study of forms, structure and syntax. In the latter part 
of the year Boox I of Xenophon's Anabasis is read. Texts: 
Goodwin and White's Anabasis, Goodwin's Greek Grammar, and 
Pearson's Composition. 

History. 

History 1. Medieval and Modern History. A general his- 
tory of the growth, and development of the civilization and 
national life of the people of Europe from the fall of Rome until 
the present time. Two hours, first semester, five hours sec- 
ond semester, second year. 

History 2. English History. A short course in English 
history to form a foundation for the elective work in the Con- 
stitutional History of England in the College Department. 

Latin. 

Al. Elementary Course. Five hours, entire year. First 
year. Latin lessons with drill on forms and syntax and acqui- 
sition of vocabulary, will be the work of the fall and winter. 
In the spring a first Latin reader will be used. Texts: Hale's 
First Latin Book, Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles (Kirkland). 

A2. Wars of Caesar, Gallic and Civil. Four hours, entire 
year. Second year. Study of life and times of Caesar. Compo- 
sition in connection with text read. Texts: Mather's Caesar, 
Bennett's Grammar, D'Ooge's Composition. 

A3. Cicero's Orations. Five hours, entire year. Third 
year. Life of Cicero. Prose Composition. Required of Classi- 
cal students. Texts: D'Ooge's Cicero, Moulton's Composition. 

A4. Vergil's Aeneid. Four hours, entire year. Fourth 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 41 

year. Required of Classical students. Five books of Vergil 
will bo read in connection with systematic review of syntax 
and study of Roman antiquities. Texts: Knapp's Vergil, Moul- 
ton's Comiposition. 

Mathematics. 

All required courses in Mathematics are consecutive. No 
student will be permitted to take up one till all the preceding 
courses have been mastered. 

Al. Algebra. Five hours, entire year. First year. Nota- 
tion and fundamental operations thoroughly considered and the 
subject continued to Simultaneous Quadratic Equations. 

A2. Geometry. Five hours, entire year. Second year. 
First twenty-four weeks given to Plane Geometry, rest of year 
to Solid Geometry. Special emphasis laid upon original work. 

A3. Geometry and Algebra. Three hours entire, year. 
Third year. First semester given to Solid Geometry. Second 
semester to Algebra, beginning with Quadratic Equations. 

Science. 

Al. Physics. Four hours, entire year. Required of all 
students in third year. 

A2. Chemistry. Four hours, first semester. Required of 
scientific students of fourth year. 

A3. Botany. Four hours, second semester. Required of 
scientific students of fourth year. 



The Normal School 



FACULTY. : 

ARCHELAUS E. TURNER, LL. D., 
Lecturer in Pedagogy. 

ALBERT G. OWEN, A. M., 
Professional Training. 

JOHN B. KLINE, Ph. B., 
Agriculture. 

KATE A. CROSS, A. B., 
English. 

NORMAL TRAINING. 

A law passed by the legislature in 1905 provides that on 
and after September 1, 1907, no person shall be granted a 
license to teach in public schools of Nebraska unless he shall 
have had one or more years of successful experience as a 
teacher, or shall have taken a minimum course of not less than 
twelve weeks for a first grade license and eight weeks for a 
second grade license, or normal training in some institution 
of learning approved by the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction as being equipped to give such normal training. 

Hastings College has been authorized by the State Super- 
intendent of Public Instruction to offer this Normal Training 
Course under state inspection. The course outlined below is 
open to all students in the Junior and Senior years in the 
Academy and may be taken as electives in those years. It may 
be taken also by anyone who has finished the Academy or a 
four-year course in a High School. 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 



43 



The course serves at least a double purpose to the pros- 
pective teacher. It not only gives him insight into methods of 
instruction, school organization and school management, but 
it also gives him a good review of most of the branches re- 
quired for a license to teach. 

As a part of this course it is required that the student, 
under the direction of a competent instructor, shall give some 
time to the visitation of graded and rural schools. 

It is thought that this course will appeal especially to 
those students who find it necessary to make their own way 
while going through college. By taking the course a student 
will be able to drop out and teach a year and return to college 
without interfering with his interest in school work. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 



First Year. 



Bible 1 
English 
Latin 1 
Algebra 



Third Year. 
Bible 3 
History 2 

Latin 3 or German 1 
Geometry (1st Semes- ") 

ter) 3 
Algebra (2nd Semes 

ter) 3 
Physics 1 



!> 



hrs. 
1 

5 
5 

5 

16 



1 

4 
5 

3 



17 



Second Year. 



Bible 2 
English 2 
Latin 2 
History 1 
Geometry 2 



Fourth Year. 

Bible 4 

Arithmetic 

Reading 

Grammar 

Geography 

3 Bookkeeping 

History (1st Semes- 
ter) 2 

Civics (2d Semester) 4 

Agriculture (1st Sem- "1 
ester) 5 ', 

Professional Training ' 
(2d Semester) 3 I 

Chemistry (1st Semes- 
ter) 2 

Botany (2d Semester) 3 



hrs. 
1 
3 
4 
4 
5 

17 



1 
I 
!^1 5 



18 



(The numbers following the studies refer to statement 



44 CATALOGUE OF 

given under each professor's department. All except special 
normal work of fourth year will be given under the general 
head of Academy.) 

SPECIAL NORMAL TRAINING COURSE. 

This work includes subject matter, underlying principles 
and methods of teaching, and enables the student to approach 
the subject from the standpoint of both teacher and pupil. 

1. A Review. Five hours, entire year, of the following: 
Reading, Grammar, Arithmetic, Geography and Bookkeeping. 
In this work outlines provided by the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction will be followed. 

2. American History. Four hours, first semester. Out- 
lines, various texts and sources. 

3. Professional Training. Four hours, second semester. 
This v/ork includes a study of methods, school management 
and observation. Various texts. 

4. Civics. Four hours, second semester. A study of state 
and national government. 

5. Agriculture. Four hours, first semester. Laboratory 
work, texts, bulletins. 




Conservatory of Music 



FACULTY. 

ARCHELAUS E. TURNER, LL.D., 
President. 

RICHARD E. YARNDLEY, Director, 
Voice Culture. 

JOHN REES, Dean, 
Violin and Pianoforte. 

(To be supplied.) 
Pianoforte, Pipe Organ and Harmony. 

MAY REES, 
Violin. 

PURPOSE. 

The Department of Music was organized for a four-fold 
purpose: 1. To combine musical and literary studies as a 
broad basis for the regular collegiate work. 2. To use the 
art of music as a means of intellectual, aesthetical and moral 
culture. 3. To furnish instruction to special and general stu- 
dents. 4. To educate teachers of music. 

No time limit can be designated for a satisfactory comple- 
tion of the course on account of differences in degree of mu- 
sical ability. Much also depends upon the preparation made 
and the amount of time and careful attention the student can 
devote to it. 

The advantages afforded by the Department will be su- 
perior in every way, and the constant aim will be to produce 
thorough, well balanced musicians, rather than to give the 



46 CATALOGUE OF 

student a superficial acquaintance with any one branch. Com- 
prehensive knowledge of the instruments chosen and of the 
theory of music is the end which is constantly sought. All 
pupils are required to take part in frequent recitals, and lec- 
tures by competent musical critics are features of the year's 
work. Those who seek musical instruction under the most 
competent teachers will find nothing lacking in the advantages 
offered by Hastings College. ^ 

EQUIPMENT. 

The Department v/ill be supplied with entirely new instru- 
ments both for teaching and practice, and careful supervision 
will be given to the practice as w<^ll as the instruction of each 
pupil. To accommodate students living in the city a teaching 
studio v/ill be o'pened in the Madgett Block in the down-town 
district. Practice rooms will be fitted up in McCormick Ilall, 
and studios for the Director and his assistant will be fur- 
nished in Alexander Hall. No feature of equipment which would 
serve to put the Department on the highest plane of efficiency 
will be omitted. 

ARTIST RECITALS. 

During the year each member of the Faculty will give a 
special program designed to illustrate the work of the Depart- 
ment. The instructors will also provide the musical numbers 
for Commencement Day program.s. . At intervals during the 
year recitals will be given by musical artists and critics from 
the larger musical centers of the country. 

COURSES OF STUDY. 
Voice Culture. 

First Grade— Lessons in correct breathing and proper 
breath control. Tone work for placing the voice and blending 
the registers. Elem.entary exercises selected from Marches! 
and Concone. Easy songs and part-songs, by standard com- 
posers. .Sight reading. 

Second Grade — Continuation of first grade work with more 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 47 

advanced exercises and songs. Part singing and choral work. 
Sight reading. 

Third Grade — Progressive work in studies for flexibility. 
Study of songs from best English, German, Italian and Amer- 
ican composers, also arias from the operas and oratorios. At 
the completion of this grade, pupils who have passed an exam- 
ination in Harmony, Theory a-nd Musical History in addition 
to three years of piano study, may receive a teacher's cer- 
tificate. 

Fourth Grade — Mere advanced work in studies by Marchesi, 
Concone, and Lamperti. Arias from Italian, German and French 
operas and standard oratorios. Also more difhcult songs from 
standard and classical composers of all nationalities. 

Pianoforte. 

Elementary Grade — Course in hand culture, legato touch; 
time; counting. Kohler's Piano Method; duets by Low-Kolling 
and others; Gurlitt, Op. 117; Schmitt, Lecouppey, Op. 17. 

Intermediate Grade, A — Fingering; major and minor 
scales; arpeggios, Beihl, Op. 44; Czerny, Op. 2G1; Lambert's 
Systematic Course; Krause, Op. 2; Heller, Op. 47; easy sonatas 
and pieces by Clementi, Kuhlan and others. 

Intermediate Grade B — Scales, major and minor, in thirds, 
sixths and tenths, double notes; Beren's Velocity Studies; Hel- 
ler, Ops. 4G, 45; Kullak's Octaven School, Book 1; Bach's 2V; 
inventions, Loeschher, Op. GC; wrist exercises by Edward Bax- 
ter Perry; technical exercises; academical studies; harmony; 
musical history. 

Advanced Grade A— "Art of Dexterity," Czerny, Op. 740; 
Cramer Studies (v. Bulow ed.) ; Moscheles, Op. 70; two and three 
part inventions. Bach, KuUak, Book II theory and harmony; 
musical history; selections from Beethoven, Mozart, Mendels- 
sohn and others. 

Advanced Grade B — Gradus ad Parnassum, Clementi (Tau- 
sig editcn); Czerny, Op. 299; Bach's 3V. Inventions, Little 
Preludes and Fugues; well tempered clavicord, by Bach, Chopin, 
Henselt, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Thalbert and 
Liszt; octave studies, Op. 281 by Low. 

N. B. — For cerlificates of proficiency in this branch three 



48 CATALOGUE OF 

studies are required, two of which must be Pianoforte and 
Theory, the third being at least two years' study elected from 
the following: Vocal Culture, Organ, Violin or Violincello. 

Violin. 

Elementary Grade — Special studies in the use of the wrist, 
arm and bow. Violin schools by F. David, Hohmann, B. Tours 
and others. Selections from studies, Kayser, Wohlfahrt and 
Dancia. Duets by Pleyel-Maza and others. 

Intermediate Grade — Violin Schools by David, Spohr, Tours 
and others. Bendix and Ferdinand Carr's Scale Studies, Schra- 
dieck's Scale Studies. Preparatory exercises in double stops — 
Sevcik. Selections from studies by Alard, Kreutzer, Leonard 
and DeBeriot. Pieecs by Wienawski, Alard, Hauser and oth- 
ers; shifting the positions and scale studies by Sevcik. 

Advanced Grade — Violin Schools by David, Spohr; studies 
by Kreutzer, Rode, Dont, Kayser; selections from the works 
of Spohn, Paganini, Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Brahms and 
others; pieces by Vieuxtemps. 

Other Stringed Instruments. 

Instruction will be given upon Viola, Violincello, Mandolin, 
Guitar and Banjo. All students of the stringed department are 
given orchestra and club work as they become suffiicently pro- 
ficient on instruments, free of charge. 

Pipe Organ. 

Before entering regularly upon the course for organ, stu- 
dents must have completed at least the third grade of the 
piano forte course or equivalents in order to insure a thorough 
knowledge of elementary technique. 

Third Grade — Exercises in pedal playing, simple studies 
in pedal obligate; playing of hymn tunes; elementary regis- 
tration; construction of interludes. 

Fourth Grade— Studies in pedal obligate. Schneider Op. 48. 
Polyphonic studies in Rinck's Organ School, Book II; study 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 49 

of preludes and postludes suitable for churcli services, includ- 
ing study in registration. 

Fifth Grade — Clemen's Modern Pedal Technique, Book IL 
Dudley Buck. Pedal phrasing studies; quartette and chorus ac- 
companiment. Bach, less difficult preludes and fugues. Easier 
movements from Mendelssohn's sonatas. 

Sixth Grade — G. Ad. Thomas Etudes, Op. 2; accompaniment 
of solo voice; study of more difficult works of Bach, Handel, 
Mendelssohn, Guilmant, Rheinberger, Merkel, etc. 

Harmony and Counterpoint. 

First Year. 

First Term — A thorough drill in keys, scales, signatures, 
intervals, construction and connection of triads. Simple and 
part-writing from given bass and soprano, Jadassohn's Manual 
of Harmony, chapters I-VI. 

Second Term — Jadassohn, chapters VH-X, together with 
easy m.odulaticns and harmonization of simple melodies. 

Second Year. 

First Term — Jadassohn, chapters XI-XVII, with many se- 
quences and other additional exercises. 

Second Term — Jadassohn, chapters XVH to end. Single 
counterpoint in bass, tv/o notes against one. 

Counterpoint, Jadassohn's and Toetschin's Complete. 

History. 

Recitations, lectures, essays, biographical sketches. Texts: 
Fillmore's History of the Pianoforte, Matthew's Popular His- 
tory of Music. 

Theory. 

Texts: Louis Elscn's Theory of Music, and Ernest Pauer's 
Musical Forms. 

TUITION. 

Rates are for a term of seventeen weeks, of which there 



50 CATALOGUE OF 

are two in each college year, not counting general examination 
periods or the holiday recess. 

CREDITS. 

A credit of one hour will be allowed in the regular literary 
courses, except in the first three years of the Academy, and 
the Senior year of the College. Completion of the full course 
in any department of the Conservatory will entitle the student 
to a certificate signed by the authorities of the institution, 
and witnessing to the proficiency and attainments of the can- 
didate. 

SPECIAL ADVANTAGES. 

Pupils will be required to take part in recitals at frequent 
intervals during the year, acquiring thereby greater proficiency 
in performance, and cultivating ease and grace in public ap- 
pearance. 

Glee clubs, mixed choruses, and a college orchestra will 
be open to such students as are sufficiently advanced as to 
enable them to perform creditably in these organizations. 

REGULATIONS. 

I. Students may enter at any time, but are not enrolled 
for less than a term. 

II. No student is allowed to take part in a public musical 
performance without the consent of the teacher in charge. 

III. The Conservatory is closed on College holidays and 
lessons falling on those days can not be made up. 

rv. No reduction is made for absences from the first two 
lessons of the terms, nor for a subsequent individual absence, 
except in case of illness. 

V. Tuition is refunded only in case of protracted sickness 
of two weeks or more, due notice having been given to the 
Director. All unexcused lessons are charged without the privi- 
lege of making them up. 

VI. Boarding students in the Conservatory are required 
to carry at least five hours of work in the literary department, 
but no extra charge is made for this instruction. Exceptions 
may be made only in special cases recommended by the head 
of the department and the Dean of the College. 



Student Organizations 



ATHLETIC — The Faculty encourages athletics within well 
defined and reasonable limits. Foot ball and track athletics 
are fostered by the institution, but on account of the severity 
of football the Faculty does not assume responsibility for the 
playing of students. They recommend that students not fully 
developed physically be not allowed to play, and any student 
under twenty-one years of age will not be permitted to take 
part in any match game until he has filed with the secretary 
of the Faculty written permission from his parents or guar- 
dian, and satisfies the Faculty of his physical condition by se- 
curing a certificate from our duly appointed medical director. 

LITERARY — A stock company of the students controls 
and manages a monthly journal known as The Collegian, which 
serves as a means of promoting the interests of the College. 
There are also literary societies admitting to membership 
both men and women, and offering their members excellent 
training in debate, composition, and parliamentary practice. An 
organization known as the Oratorical and Debating Council 
has for its object the fostering of interest in oratory and debate, 
and its constitution provides that 

"Any bona fide student of the College of Liberal Arts shall 
be entitled to membership, provided he give his name to the 
Secretary of the Council and pay into the treasury the sum of 
fifty cents." 

RELIGIOUS— The Y. M. C. A. and Y. W. C. A. are active 
student organizations doing general as well as specific Chris- 
tian work in the College. The City Y. M. C. A. offers the splen- 
did advantages of its new building to our students at a nom- 
inal fee. A student pastor, supported by the First Presby- 
terian Church, has direct oversight of the spiritual life of the 
students and gives general direction to their religious activ- 
ities. 

The Y. M. C. A. takes special pains to assist new students 

.etting located and in securing employment. Mr. S. M. 



m g 



52 CATALOGUE OF 

Weyer is chairman of the committee to meet incoming students 
and if they will write him stating the time of their arrival 
the committee will be glad to meet them at the station. Mr. 
D. B. Carne is chairman of a committee which undertakes to 
find employment for students who are required to supplement 
their resources. Such students are requested to communicate 
with Mr. Carne. 

The names of the principal organizations of students, w^ith 
their officers, are given in the following table. 

COLLEGE DIRECTORY 

COLLEGIAN JOINT STOCK COMPANY 
D. B. Carne, '10, President. 
B. Perle Phillips, '08, Secretary. 

DRAMATIC CLUB 

Miss Bwing, President. 

Saira Brooks, '10, Vice-President. 

Daisy Bamford, '10, Secretary. 

DEBATING LEAGUE 

D. B, Carne, '10, President. 
John Mohlman, '08, Secretary. 

GERMAN CLUB 

Professor Walsh, President. 
Alice Sayre, '10, Secretary. 
Wiliam F. Raney, '11, Treasurer. 

PESTALOZZIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

John Mohlman, '08, President. 
Carl Hull, '08, Secretary. 

WHITTIERIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 

Wilsey Tompkins, Academy '10, President. 
Carl Theobald, '11, Secretary. 

YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

D. B. Carne, '10^ President. i 

Harry Russell, '10, Secretary. 

YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
Alice Siayre, '10, President. 
Jennie Haner, '10, Secretary. i 



Register of Students 



THE COLLEGE. 

Senior Class. 

Brinkema, Margaret Hastings 

Funke, Henry W Blue Hill 

Gaymon, Alison Hastings 

Hull, Carl Hastings 

Humphrey, Frank C Edgar 

Johnston, Jeanette Wilsonville 

McDougall, George F Hastings 

Mohlmian, John Glenville 

Phillips, Besse P Hastings 

Junior Class. 

Tngalls, Helen Doniphan 

Lichtenberg, Adam Hastings 

Ranney, Carl Blue Hill 

Sager, Byron G Gibbon 

Sophomore Class. 

Brooks, Laura Hastings 

Carne, Douglas B Trenton, Tenn. 

Erwin, Elsie Nelson 

Planer, Jennie Lemars, Iowa 

Russell, Plarry Kenesaw 

Sayre, Alice Gering 

Spicer, Erma Hastings 

Spicer, Minnie Hastings 

Tompkins, Ellen Hastings 

Warner, Ruth Edison 

Welker, Clare Hastings 

V/elker, Linn Hastings 

Whitehouse, George Prosser 

Wigton, Nellie Hastings 



54 CATALOGUE OF 

Freshman Class. 

Ambler, Kelly Candy 

Bamford, Daisy Ord 

Barbour, Charles Scottsbluff 

Barbour, Neal Scottsbluff 

Barrett, Ella Hastings 

Bowlus, Ralph Hastings 

Crawford, George Woodriver 

Doty, Ralph Hastings 

Evans, Rue Hastings 

Fisher, Flora Hastings 

Hilton, Ethel Blue Hill 

Ingalsbe, Mattie Inland 

Jones, Olive Hastings 

Livingston, Jay Trumbull 

Logan, Claudia Blue Hill 

Mann, Willard T Hastings 

McGowan, Claude Scottsbluff 

McGowan, Walter Scottsbluff 

Owen, Lois Hastings 

Ramsey, "Walker Trumbull 

Raney, William Hastings 

Siawyer, Earl ScottS'bluff 

S'herrerd, Earl Woodriver 

Shetler, Fay Holdrege 

Sims, Forrest Hastings 

Spelts, Jay Woodriver 

Theobald, Carl Bruning 

Weldon, Kirk Woodriver 

Weyer, Frank Ainsworth 



THE ACADEMY. 

Class of 1908. 

Daniels, Nellie Clarks 

Firme, Florence Hastings 

Foote, Ray Hansen 

Leamons, Grace Clarks 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 55 

Monahan, Viva ^y, 

Whitehoufce, Grace Prosser 

Class of 1909. 

Anderson, Edwin Stockham 

Bates, IJargaret Hastings 

Day, Triimau Boone 

Eisenhart, Eugene Culbertson 

Haverly, Cecil Hastings 

Highland, Jay Sweetwater 

Hill, Ona Hardy 

Hill, Vera Hardy 

Kirk, Hazel Culbertson 

Linson, Vv alter ■ Heartwell 

McKenzie, Lela Madrid 

Owen, Albert A Hastings 

Ruepp, Chris Culbertson 

Theobald, Mattie Bruning 

Vv^alker, Ernest Pawnee City 

Wells, Agnes Stockham 

Class of 1910. 

Barr, Bessie Trumbull 

Brinkema, Justus Hastings 

Brooks, Paul Hastings 

Chiludress, Orval Bostwick 

Crawford, Nolle Elm Creek 

E'by, Walter Imperial 

Gossan, David W Hastings 

Holm, Julia Trumbull 

Kline, Daniel H Hastings 

Lamp, Guy Inland 

Lathrop, Chelsea Inland 

Martin, Elsie Trumbull 

Peters, Elipha Minatare 

Scofiold, Lucille Hansen 

Tompkins, V/ilsey Hastings 

Williams, Fern Hastings 

Wisner, Wilsey Hansen 

Work, John Hazard 



56 CATALOGUE OF 

Class of 1911. 

Ambler, Harry Gandy 

Bltner, Chris ! Hastings 

Crosson, William Hastings 

Johnson, Elmore ! Gandy 

Kindig, Fred Hansen 

Mott, Wilfred ! Hastings 

Sims, Leonard L Hansea 

Weyer, Stephen M Ainsworth 

Special. 

Gibson, Winnie Wilsonville 

Kinnier, Bessie Spalding 

Kinnier, Frances Spalding 

Odell, Leota Juniata 

Ross, Adam Hastings 

Uerling, Dena Ayr 

NORMAL STUDENTS. 

Bamford, Daisy Hastings 

Brinkema, Margaret Hastings 

Carne, Douglas B Trenton, Tenn. 

Daniels, Nellie Clarks 

Funke, Henry Blue Hill 

Gaymon, Allison Hastings 

Gibson, Winnie Wilsonville 

Hull, Carl Hastings 

Humphrey, Frank Edgar 

Highland, James N Sweetwater 

Ingalls, Helen Doniphan 

Johnston, Jeanette Wilsonville 

Kinnier, Bessie Spalding 

Kinnier, Grace ' Spalding 

Leamons, Grace Clarks 

T>ichtenberg, Adam Hastings 

McDougall, Geo. F Hastings 

Mohlman, .John Glenville 

Odell, Leota Hastings 

Phillips, Bess E Hastings 



» 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 57 

Ranney, Carl Blue Hill 

Ross, Adam Hastings 

Sager, Byron G Gibbon 

Spicer, Minnie Hastings 

Tompkins; Ellen Hastings 

Uerling. Dena Ayr 

Welker, Henry C Hastings 

MUSIC DEPARTrViENT. 

Allyn, Arthur E Hastings 

Anderson, Harry Hastings 

Anderson, Lillian Hastings 

Boiler, Ilva Hastings 

Brown, Leonard Hastings 

Capps, Ruth Hastings 

Clark, Alfreda Hastings 

Cook, Helen Hastings 

Cook, Jack Hastings 

Coulter, Vinnie E Hastings 

Edgerton, Fay Hastings 

Edwards, Bonnie F Hastings 

Evans, Rena Hastings 

Falkner, Ruth Hastings 

Firme, Florence A Hastings 

Flowers, Gladys Hastings 

Hamsher, Florence Hastings 

Higinbotham, Mary Hastings 

Hill, Vera Hardy 

Holm, Julia Doniphan 

Hosier, Alberta Hastings 

Ingalsbie, Mattie Inland 

Janssen, Marie Hastings 

Jones, Octavia Hastings 

Kauf, Selma HastiUt^s 

Kernan, Abigail .... iiastings 

Kernan, Stella Hastings 

Kinnier, Bessie Spalding 

Klein, Hazel Hastings 

Kreinheder, Anna Hastings 



58 CATALOGUE OF 

Kreinheder, Martha Hastings 

Logan, Claudia M Blue Hill 

Manahan, Verna Hastings 

McParland, Perle Wilsonville 

McKenzie, Lela Madrid 

Meyer, Clare Hastings 

Meyer, Floyd F Hastings 

Morgan, Gladys Hastings 

Murray, Naomi Hastings 

Nellis, Ruth Hastings 

Oliver, Bernice Hastings 

Plamondon, Eulalia Hastings 

Pizer, Mildred Hastings 

Rapp, EfRe Hastings 

Rawson, Verna May Hastings 

Robinson, Ethel Hastings 

Sheashy, Louis E Hastings 

Shetler, Fay Holdrege 

Shouse, Ethel Hastings 

Slaker, Elizabeth K Hastings 

Slaker, Ruth Hastings 

Spatz, Ward Fairfield 

Theobald, Mattie Bruning 

Tomlinson, Nellie E Hastings 

Vance, Irma Hastings 

Vance, Lena Hastings 

Westerman, Harold D Hastings 

Weyer, Mrs. C. W Hastings 

Whitehouse, George Prosser 

DEPARTMENT OF ORATORY. 

Ambler, Kelly Gaudy 

Bamford, Daisy Ord 

Barbour, Charles Scottsbluff 

Barl)Our, Neal Scottsbluff 

Barrett, Ella M Hastings 

Barr, Bessie Hastings 

Brinkema, Justus J Hastings 

Brinkema, Margaret Hastings 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 59 



Of J 



Brooks, Laura Hastin 

Came, Douglas B Trenton, Tenn, 

Crawford, George Wood River 

Crosscn, William Hastings 

Etiniels, Nellie Clarks 

Dct3^ Ralph Hastings 

Erwin, Elsie Nelson 

Firme, Florence Hastings 

Foote, Ray Hansen 

Funke, Henry Blue Hill 

Gibson, Winnie Wilsonville 

Haner, Jennie LeMars, Iowa 

Highland, Jay Sweetwater 

Hill, Ona Hardy 

Hilton, Ethel Blue Hilll 

Humphrey, Frank Edgar 

Ingalls, Helen Doniphan 

Johnston, Jeanette Wilsonville 

Jones, Olive Hastings 

Kinnier, Bessie Spalding 

Kinnier,' Grace Spalding 

Kirk, Hazel Culbertson 

Leamons, Grace Clarks 

Lichtenburg, Adam Hastings 

Livingston, Jay V^ Trumbull 

Logan, Claudia Blue Hill 

Mann, Willard Hastings 

McGowan, Claude Scottshluff 

McGowan, Walter Scottsbluff 

Monohan, Viva Ayr 

Odell, Leota Juniata 

Owen, Lois Hastings 

Phillips, Bess P Hastings 

Ramsey, Walker Trumbull 

Raney, William P Hastings 

Ranney, Carl Blue Hill 

Ross, Adam Hastings 

Russell, Harry Kenesaw 

Sager, Byron G Gibbon 

Sawyer, Earl Scottsbluff 



o 



60 CATALOGUE OF 

Sayre, Alice Gerin 

Sherrerd, Earl Wood River 

Shetler, Fay D Holdrege 

Spelts, Jay Wood River 

Spicer, Erma Hastings 

Spicer, Minnie Hastings 

Theobald, Carl Bruning 

Tompkins, Ellen Hastings 

Warner, Ruth Edison 

Weldon, Kirk Wood River 

Welker, Linn Hastings 

Weyer, Frank Ainsworth 

Whitehouse, Grace Prosser 

Whitehouse, George Prosser 

Wigton, Nellie Hastings 



School of Oratory 



For the year 1908-09 the College will not offer special in- 
struction in this department, as the resources of the institu- 
tion do not permit the employment of an instructor giving 
full time to this work. It is hoped that such an instructor giving 
be employed by the beginning of another year. Meanwhile, 
•students who desire to specialize in this department can secure 
instruction of the highest grade from Mrs. F. C. Babcock, who 
resides in Hastings and who is a teacher and reader of unusual 
excellence. 



I 



PROGRAM OF COMMENCEMENT WEEK, 1908. 

SUNDAY. JUNE 7. 

10:30 A. M. — Baccalaureate Sermon by Rev. Saumel Garvin, A. 
M, Pastor First Presbyteiian Church, Kansas City, 
Kansas. 

8:00 P. M. — Annual Address to Christian Associations, Hon. 
Yv. S. Andrews, Auditor ot Treasury Department, 
Washington. D. C. 

MONDAY, JUNE 8. 

9:00 A. M.— Finsl Chapel Service. 

10:30 A. M. — Recital in Oratcry. 

2:30 P. M.— Flag Raising", with Address by Past Post Com- 
mander, L. A. Payne, of Silas A. Strickland Post, 
G. A. R. 

3:00 P. M.— lRt.er-Class Field Meet. 

8:30 P. M. — Annual Recital of Music Department. 

TUESDAY, JUNE 9. 

10:30 A. M. — Contest in Oratcry, for Currens Biblical Prize. 
2:30 P. M. — Dedication of Alexander Hall, follov/ed by Class 

Day Exercises. 
C:00 P. M. — Dinner of Hastings College Society. 
8:30 P. M. — Junior Lawn Fete. 

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10. 

10:00 A. M.— COMMENCEMENT. 

Oration by Hon. George L. Sheldon, Governor of 
Nebraska. 

12:00 M. — Alumni Banquet. 

3:30 P. M. — Laying of Corner Stone of Carnegie Building. 
Address by Rev. W. W. Lawrence, D. D., Lincoln, 
Nebraska. 

8:30 P. M. — Song and Lecture Recital by Director R. E. 
Yarndley. 



Alumni Association 



OFFICERS. 

Janet L. Carpenter, '92, President. 

Gertrude Weingart, '01, Secretary-Treasurer. 

Inaccuracies of any kind in this list will be cheerfully cor- 
rected, and members of this Association are urged to co-oper- 
ate with its officers by notifying them of changes of location 
or employment. 

1887. 

J. H. H. Hewitt, A, B., Lawyer, Alliance, Nebr. 

1888. 

Mrs. Edith Haynes Maunder, A. B., Hastings, Nebr. 

Mrs. Alice Nowlan Clouser, A. B., Thermopolis, Wyo. 

Robert N. Powers, A. B., Pastor Presbyterian Church, 
Scottsbluff, Nebr. 

Mrs. Alice Yocum Bondessen, A. B., Yuma, Ariz. 

Mrs. Carrie Kimball Koystman, A. B., Baraboo, Wis. 

Francis I. Cunningham, A. B., Principal Schools, Troy, 
Idaho. 

1889. 

Henry R. Corbett, Sc. B., 5707 Monroe Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Mary L. Crissman, A. B., A. M., Long Beach, Cal. 

D. W. Montgomery, A. B., Pastor Presbyterian Church. 
Wiliamsburg, Iowa, 

Elizabeth Stine, Sc. B., Teacher, Cheyenne, V/yo. 

1800. 

D. C. Montgomery, A. B., (Deceased.) 

Mrs. Eva Frankenburger Fresher, B. L., Kentland, Ind. 

Ira McConoughy, A. B., Pastor Presbyterian Church, Ther- 
mopolis, Vv^'yo. 

Mrs. Maud M. Wotring Raymond, A. B., Boulder, Wyo. 

1891. 

Frederick Goble, Sc. B., Lumber Merchant, Silverton, Colo. 

Maud H. Jorgensen, B. L., Accountant, Hastings, Nebr. 

Emma M. Nowlan, Sc. B., City Librarian, Hastings, Nebr. 

Ida I Myers, Sc. B., 924 Simbury Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 63 

1892. 

Robert E. Moritz, Sc. B., Ph. D., Prof, of Mathematics, State 
University, Seattle, Wash. 

Mrs. Kathleen Hartigan Goble, A. B., Silverton, Colo. 

Janet L. Carpenter, A. B., A. M., Instructor in Greek, HaEt- 
ings College, Hastings, Nebr. 

Charles C. Caton, A. B., Farmer, Roseland, Nebr. 

Mrs. Lida Powell Hoeppner, B. L., Hastings, Nebr. 

1893. 

Mrs. Jennie Stuckey Barrett, A. B., 4463 Woodlawn Ave., 
Chicago, 111. 

Fcoyal S. Stuckey, A. B., Physician, Grafton, Nebr. 

Alma Chapman, Sc. B., Physician, Hastings, Nebr. 

Mrs. Rosanna Stein Clawson, A. B., Longmont, Colo. 

Clyde B. Atchison, Sc. B., Lawyer, 687 Wasco St., Port- 
land, Oregon. 

Hallie Plood, A. B., 1750 George Ave., Omaha, Nebr. 

George Norlin, A. B., Ph. D., Prof, of Greek,, University 
of Colorado, Boulder, Colo. 

1894. 

Mrs. Laura Baily Brown, A. B., A. M., 1009 Sinto Ave., 
Spokane, Wash. 

Harriet Myers, Sc. B., Tropica, Cal. 

Mrs. Bertha Green Connell, A. B., Tulerosa, N. M. 

William L. Little, A. B., Physician, St. Paul, Minn. 

Harry B. Allen, A. B., Pastor Presbyterian Church, Aledo, 
Illinois. 

Etta Caton, A. B., Teacher, Roseland, Nebr. 

Grace Shepherd, A. B., Teacher, Idaho State Normal, Lew- 
iston, Idaho. 

1895. 

Mrs. Lillian Brown Steele, A. B., 84 Grove St., Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Mrs. Martha Cunningham Brown, , A. B., Divernon, 111. 

Tranqueline Andrews, Sc. B., Steele City, Nebr. 

Mrs. Lettie Shepherd Mudge, A. B., 123 Albany St., Ottum- 
wa, Iowa. 

1896. 

Robert A. Patterson, Sc. B., (Deceased.) 

Charles A. Arnold, A. B., Assistant Paster House of Hope, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



G4 CATALOGUE OF 

William O. Bunce, Sc. B., (Deceased.) 

1897. 

J. Edgar Jones, A. B., Lawyer, Hastings, Nebr. 

William E, Kunz, A. B., Pastor Presbyterian Church, Ida 
Grove, Iowa. 

Alfred E. Barrows, A. B., Pastor Presbyterian Church, 
Homer, Illinois. 

1898. 
William H. Chapman, Sc. B., First Assistant Physician, 
State Inst, for Insane, Hastings, Nebr. 

Benjamin L. Brittin, A. B., Minister, Belvidere, 111, 

1899. 

Ernest M, Brouillette, A. B., Lawyer, Denver, Colo. 

James B. Brown, A. B., American Mission, Tripoli, Syria. 

Edward R. Bushnell. A. B., Journalist. "The North Ameri- 
can," Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clarence M. Cooke, A. B., Lawyer, Farmers Bank Build- 
ing, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Urdell Montgomery, A_ B., Missionary, Barabo, India. 

Richard D. Moritz, Sc. B., Principal Scliools, Red Cloud, 
Nebraska. 

Charles Stein, Sc. B., Physician, Immanuel Hospital, Oma- 
ha, Nebr. 

Wilson F, Stichter, A. B., Teacher, Newcastle, Nebr. 

1900. 

Joseph Bailey, A. B., Banker, 1007 Baldwin St., Spokane, 
Wash. 

Margaret E. Haughawout, A. B., A. M., Dean of Women, 
Alma College, Alma, Mich. 

Julia M. Heartwell, A. B., Long Beach, Cal. 

Mrs. Margaret Jones Smith, A. B., Missionary, Kashing, 
China. 

David J. Lewis, B. L., Journalist, Hastings, Nebr. 

R. Melvin Smith, A. B., Principal Pcynette Academy, Poy- 
nette, V/is. 

Mrs. M. Aberdeen Webber Catelle, 721 Monroe St., Madi- 
son, Wis. 

Roy A. White, A. B.. Pocatello, Idaho. 

Harrison A. Wigton, A. B., Physician, Lincoln, Nebr. 



HASTINGS COLLEGE 65 

John Brown, A. B., Minister, Dubuc, Saskatchawan, Can. 

1901. 

Mrs. Edna Ball Davis, Sc. B., Hastings, Nebr. 

Allen Carpenter, A. B., Prof, of Mathematics, Hastings Col- 
lege, Hastings, Nebr. 

Chris. Christensen, Sc. B., Surveyor, Sheridan, Wyo. 

Henry S, G. Hurlburt, Sc. B., Electrician, Tonopah, Nev. 

George U. Ingalsbee, Sc. B., 145 So. 11th St., Lincoln, Nebr. 

Mrs. Julia Jones Osborne, A. B., Wayne, Nebr. 

Hugh T. Mitchelmore, A. B., Preshyterian Minister, Ana- 
cartes, Wash. 

Thomas C. Osborne, A, B., Pastor Pastor Presbyterian 
Church, Wayne, Nebr. 

Annie L. Richards, A. B,, Teacher, Pinnie, Wyo. 

Gertrude Vv^eingart, Sc. B., Teacher, Hastings, Nebr. 

Grace Ingalsbe, A. B., Teacher, Inland, Nebr. 

1902. 

Grace A. Boyd, A. B., Teacher, Blue Hill, Nebr. 

Pvlrs. Anna Halberg Anderson, A. B., Axtell, Nebr. 

Henry C. Tv*illard, A. B., Presbyterian Minister, Ontario, 
Centre, N. Y. 

1903. 

Esther H. Alexander, A. B., Teacher, Hastings, Nebr. 

William H. Cassell, A. B., Presbyterian Minister, West 
Bend, lovvra. 

Mrs. Goldie Edgerton Ferguson, A. B., 1221 West Irving 
Park Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
Aileen Cress, Sc. B., Teacher, Glenville, Nebr. 

Cecil Phillips, A. B., Pastor Presbyterian Church, Mina- 
tare, Nebr. 

Charles P. Russell, Sc. B., Missionary Teacher, Ameiican 
College, Assuit, Egypt 

1904. 

Bernard J. Brinkema, Sc. B., Presbyterian Minister, North 
East, Md. 

John Skinner, A. B., Presbyterian Minister, Davenport, 
Wash 

1905. 

Elmer T. Peters, Sc. B., Instructor in High School, Atchi- 
son, Kans. 



66 CATALOGUE OF 

Alexander J. Dunlap, Sc. B., Instructor in High School, 
Minden, Nebr. 

William Roy Hull, A. B., Instructor in High School, Hast- 
ings, Nebr. 

1906. 
Lawrence A. Wright, A. B., Principal of Schools, Giltner, 
Nebr. 

1907. 
Marmaduke M. Forrester, A. B., Journalist, Hastings, Nebr. 
Magdalena Gueck, B. L., Teacher, LeMars, Iowa. 
Francis R. Striker, A. B., Teacher, Axtell, Nebr. 
Robert C. Theobald, A. B., Asst. Secretary Y. M. C. A., 
Omaha, Nebr. 




Index 



I — Calendar 3 

II — Trustees and Committees 4 — 5 

III — Faculty and Assistants 6 — 8 

IV— Other Officers 8 

V — Committees of the Faculty 8 

VI — General Information 9 — 23 

Accredited Schools 19—20 

Admission 16 

Amount of Work 17 

Attendance upon Classes 17 

Boarding 13 

Certificates 18 

Coeducation 14 

Courses and Degrees 20 

Dormitories 12 

Deportment 17 

Endowment 22 

General Regulations 16 

Grounds and Buildings 10 

Leaving School 18 

Library 11 

Location 10 

Organization ,. . 9 

Prizes 22 

Registration 17 

Religious Influences 15 

Scholarships 18 

Teachers' Courses 21 

Tuition and Fees 13 

VII— The College 24—36 

Astronomy 33 

Bible 26 

Biology and Physics 27 

Courses of Study 24 

Education 28 



English 29 

French 33 

Greek 31 

German 34 

History 31 

Latin 32 

Mathematics 33 

Modern Languages 33 

Outline of Courses 26 

Philosophy 35 

Political Science 36 

VIII— The Academy , 37—41 

Admission 37 

Bible 38 

Courses of Study 37 

English 39 

German 39 

Greek 40 

History 40 

Latin 40 

Mathematics 41 

Outline of Courses 38 

Science 41 

IX— The Normal School 42—44 

Course of Study 43 

Faculty 42 

Normal Training 42 

Special Training Course 44 

X — Conservatory of Music 45 — 50 

Artist Recitals 46 

Courses of Study 46 

Credits 50 

Equipment 46 

Faculty 45 

Harmony 49 

History 49 

Pianoforte 47 

Pipe Organ 48 

Purpose 45 

Regulations 50 

Special Advantages 50 

Stringed Instruments 48 

Theory 49 



Tuition 49 

Violin 48 

Voice Culture 46 

XI — Student Organizations 51 — 52 

Athletic 51 

College Directory 52 

Literary 51 

Religious 51 

XII— Register of Students 53—60 

Academy 54 — 56 

College 53—54 

Music Department 57 — 58 

Normal Students 56 — 57 

Oratory 58—60 

School of Oratory Announcement 60 

XIII — Commencement Week Program 61 

XIV — Alumni Association 62 — 66 

Classes 62—66 

Officers 62 



THE 
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UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS-URBANA 



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